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N Scale - Dream Designs - DDGMRC1850 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD GP9 - Green Mountain - 1850

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N Scale - Dream Designs - DDGMRC1850 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD GP9 - Green Mountain - 1850 Copyright held by TroveStar


Production Type Regular Production
Stock Number DDGMRC1850
Original Retail Price $125.00
Brand Dream Designs
Aftermarket Decorator Dream Designs
Manufacturer Atlas
Body Style Atlas Diesel Engine GP9
Prototype Locomotive, Diesel, EMD GP9 (Details)
Road or Company Name Green Mountain (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 1850
Paint Color(s) Green and Yellow
Print Color(s) Yellow
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Wheel Type Chemically Blackened Metal
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Body Material Plastic
DCC Readiness No
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype EMD
Model Variety GP9
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160


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Model Information: The Atlas GP7, GP7-TT, GP9 and GP9-TT models are some of Atlas' oldest models. The four locomotives share the same internal mechanisms and differ only in their shell details. Unlike many of their other older body styles, these bodies have been updated several times and are still a regular part of the Atlas production cycle.

Given their long history of releases, these models come in a plethora of different versions. The first release of this body type was in 1974 and the models were produced by Roco in Austria. Production for these models ended in 1982. The next release started in 1987 and the models were re-tooled by Kato in Japan for Atlas. The Kato version re-used the same mechanism as was used in the earlier RS3. It doesn't work as well in the Geep. The third version was made in China for Atlas and these engines were essentially a redo of the Kato mechanism (with all the faults). Finally, in 2006, the mechanism was redone properly and this 4th version is a properly DCC-Ready split frame, slow-motor modern engine.

Assembly instructions from Atlas: GP9 (Japan version), GP9 Ph.2 (China version).

DCC Information: The first version of this engine (Roco) gets a solid "No" for DCC capability, but this is no surprise as these were made in 1974. The next two releases (Kato and China) are split-frame, but also split-board. They may be DCC-Friendly, but likely it will be a fair amount of work to upgrade these. The most recent version (China, 2006+) is eminently DCC-Ready. Furthermore, most road-names and numbers produced since 2006 are available in both a DCC-Ready and a Decoder-Equipped version. Earlier DCC factory-equipped versions were fitted with Lenz LE063XF decoders, whereas most recent versions are fitted with NCE N12A2 decoders. The Atlas version of these decoders will respond to manufacturer's address "127" (CV8) i.e. "Atlas Model Railroad Products", though being identical to their original manufacturer's specification.

For non-DCC-ready versions, a wired DCC decoder installation for this model can be found on Brad Myers' N-scale DCC decoder installs blog.

Models produced since 2006 accept the following plug-in decoders:
- Digitrax DN163A4: 1.5 Amp N Scale Board Replacement Mobile Decoder for Atlas GP30 and other short Atlas diesel locomotives.
- Digitrax DN163A2: Retired decoder, replaced by DN163A4.
- NCE N12A2: Plug and play decoder for N-Scale Atlas Classic Series GP7, GP9, GP30, GP35.
- TCS ASD4 (Installation for GP7, Installation for GP9)
- MRC 1955: N-Scale Sound Decoder for Atlas GP-7, GP-9, GP-30 or GP-35

Prototype History: An EMD GP9 is a four-axle diesel-electric locomotive built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division in the United States, and General Motors Diesel in Canada between January, 1954, and August, 1963. US production ended in December, 1959, while an additional thirteen units were built in Canada, including the last two in August, 1963. Power was provided by an EMD 567C sixteen-cylinder engine which generated 1,750 horsepower (1.30 MW). This locomotive type was offered both with and without control cabs; locomotives built without control cabs were called GP9B locomotives. All GP9B locomotives were built in the United States between February, 1954, and December, 1959.

One option available for locomotives without dynamic brakes, was to remove the two 22.5 in × 102 in (571.5 mm × 2,590.8 mm) air reservoir tanks from under the frame, and replace them with four 12 in × 150.25 in (304.80 mm × 3,816.35 mm) tanks that were installed on the roof of the locomotive, above the prime mover. These “torpedo tubes” as they were nicknamed, enabled the fuel and water tanks to be increased to 1,100 US gallons (4,200 l; 920 imp gal) each, although some railroads opted for roof-mounted air tanks and 2,200 US gallons (8,300 l; 1,800 imp gal) fuel tanks on their freight ‘Geeps’.

From Wikipedia

Road Name History: The Green Mountain Railroad (reporting mark GMRC) is a class III railroad operating in Vermont. The Green Mountain Railway (GMRC) was one of the successors of the Rutland, which perished in 1963. It was formed in early 1964 when F. Nelson Blount, the founder of Steamtown, leased 52 miles of track from the State of Vermont between Bellows Falls and Rutland. The GMRC did local freight service and some bridge line business using at the outset former Rutland diesels. The railroad operates on a rail line between North Walpole, New Hampshire, and Rutland, Vermont. Corporate colors are green and yellow.

GMRC controlled the tracks that were used for Steamtown's excursions between Riverside Station in Bellows Falls and Chester, Vermont. After Blount's death in 1967, GMRC changed hands, and a bitter relationship between two organizations developed. The Green Mountain Railroad remained in operation, though, including running its own diesel-powered tourist trains. In 1997 what was left of the Rutland in Vermont was put back together again when the Vermont Railway purchased the Green Mountain. The GMRC is now part of the ?Vermont Railway System.?


Item created by: gdm on 2016-09-02 15:59:45. Last edited by gdm on 2018-08-08 17:05:52

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