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N Scale - Walthers - 932-8653 - Hopper, 3-Bay, Covered, Pullman Standard, PS-2CD 4427 - Cargill - 2514

One of these sold for: $19.99

N Scale - Walthers - 932-8653 - Hopper, 3-Bay, Covered, Pullman Standard, PS-2CD 4427 - Cargill - 2514


N Scale - Walthers - 932-8653 - Hopper, 3-Bay, Covered, Pullman Standard, PS-2CD 4427 - Cargill - 2514 An image of the prototype.


Brand Walthers
Stock Number 932-8653
Manufacturer Walthers
Body Style Walthers Covered Hopper PS 4427
Road/Company Name Cargill
Reporting Marks TLDX
Road/Reporting Number 2514
Paint Color(s) Gray
Print Color(s) Black
Body Construction Plastic
Coupler Type Generic Magnetic Knuckle
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Deep Flange
Item Category Rolling Stock
Model Type Covered Hopper
Model Subtype 50 Foot PS
Model Variety 4427
Prototype Hopper, 3-Bay, Covered, Pullman Standard, PS-2CD 4427
Prototype Manufacturer Name Pullman Standard Car Manufacturing Company
Prototype Model Name PS-2CD 4427
Region North America
Era/Epoch Epoch III: 1950 - 1970


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Prototype Information: Even with Pullman Standard Car Manufacturing Company's passenger car designs and patents spun off to a separate company called Pullman Technology in 1982 (which was eventually sold to Canadian based Bombardier in 1987) and Pullman Standard's remaining railcar manufacturing plants and freight car designs and patents sold to Trinity Industries in 1984, American manufactured Pullman freight and passenger cars were (and to this point in time still are) well known in North America.

When it came to hauling dry bulk goods such as agricultural commodities, cement, clay, dry chemicals, salt, or sand. many railroads and private owners selected the Pullman Standard PS-2 series covered hopper.

Utilized to transport dense and heavy granular products like cement, clay, potash, and sand, due to North American axle weight load limits, two (and later) three bay models were often chosen.

When it came to hauling much lighter commodities such as barley, corn, grain, malt, oats, soybeans, sugar, and wheat, these kinds of products would most commonly be transported in three or four bay covered hoppers.

Unlike two bay models, large four bay cars lend themselves to rapid load and discharge operations.

While there are a wide range of products covered by the PS-2 designation, it was Pullman's 4427 cubic foot capacity covered hopper that stood out as being the first of the larger capacity models to be manufactured in greater numbers.

Introduced as the PS-2CD (center discharge) in late 1963, the early production "low hip" design 4427 cubic foot capacity cars had low body sides, which concealed most of the hopper bay area.

The manufacturing of "high hip" design raised side 4427 models commenced in November 1966.

Visibly apparent are a few different body style variations.

With the latter style being the most popular choice, the top of the covered hoppers could be fitted with large trough style openings, or, a series of round ones.

With the latter position being most common, brake wheels could be positioned high up on the body end, or, low mounted.

Contemporary unit train operation is a common sight in North America.

Plying North America railways are unit trains consisting of long strings of agricultural commodity laden covered hopper cars, which are seen transporting barley, corn, flour, grain, malt, oats, soybeans, sugar, and wheat from the corn and wheat belt regions of the United States to various markets, mills, and ports.

Road/Company Information:
Cargill, Inc. is an American privately held global corporation based in Minnetonka, Minnesota, a Minneapolis suburb. Founded in 1865, it is now the largest privately held corporation in the United States in terms of revenue. If it were a public company, it would rank, as of 2015, number 12 on the Fortune 500, behind McKesson and ahead of AT&T.

Some of Cargill's major businesses are trading, purchasing and distributing grain and other agricultural commodities, such as palm oil; trading in energy, steel and transport; the raising of livestock and production of feed; producing food ingredients such as starch and glucose syrup, vegetable oils and fats for application in processed foods and industrial use. Cargill also operates a large financial services arm, which manages financial risks in the commodity markets for the company. In 2003, it split off a portion of its financial operations into a hedge fund called Black River Asset Management, with about $10 billion of assets and liabilities. It owned 2/3 of the shares of The Mosaic Company (sold off in 2011), one of the world's leading producers and marketers of concentrated phosphate and potash crop nutrients.

Cargill declared revenues of $136.7 billion and earnings of $2.31 billion in the 2013 fiscal year. Employing over 140,000 employees in 66 countries, it is responsible for 25% of all United States grain exports. The company also supplies about 22% of the US domestic meat market, importing more product from Argentina than any other company and is the largest poultry producer in Thailand. All of the eggs used in McDonald's restaurants in the US pass through Cargill's plants. It is the only producer of Alberger process salt in the US, which is used in the fast-food and prepared food industries.

Cargill remains a family-owned business, as the descendants of the founder (from the Cargill and MacMillan families) own over 90% of the company.[8] As a result, most of its growth has been due to reinvestment of the company's own earnings rather than public financing. Gregory R. Page, who is not part of either the Cargill or MacMillan families, is the executive chairman of Cargill. He succeeded former CEO Warren Staley in mid-2007, as Staley reached Cargill's mandatory retirement age of 65, before he in turn was succeeded by Dave MacLennan.

From Wikipedia

Brand/Importer Information:
Wm. K. Walthers, Inc., was founded in Milwaukee in 1932 -- but really, it started years earlier, when seven-year-old Bill Walthers got his first taste of the hobby with a small, wind-up toy train for Christmas. He continued with the hobby and eventually had an attic layout comprised primarily of his own scratch-built creations. After he wrote a series of articles on building train control and signaling systems, he got so many letters from other modelers that he began manufacturing them. The first ad (in the May issue of The Model Maker) offered a 24-page, 15c catalog that listed rail, couplers, and electrical supplies. Sales were over $500.00 for the first year, and the fledgling company was off to a strong start.

Within five years, Walthers had grown so much that larger quarters were needed. Space was found on Erie Street, where everything -- from milled wood parts to metal castings to decals -- was made in-house. 1937 also saw a new line in HO Scale, featured in its own catalog. Bill brought operating layouts to the 1939 World's Fair, which gave the hobby a big boost. Soon, though, the growing possibility of war overshadowed these successes, and supplies were becoming increasingly difficult to obtain.

During the war, model manufacturers were ordered to stop production in order to conserve critical metal supplies. Walthers produced what it could from nonessential materials. A series of ads in 1943 saw Bill literally scraping the bottom of a barrel! The postwar boom meant rapid growth for the hobby; however, small homes and new families left no room for O scale layouts, and many modelers moved to HO Scale.

The next twenty years brought great change. In 1958, Bill retired and his son Bruce took over. Just as full-size railroads were being hard-hit by new technology, so too were model railroads. Leisure time was spent in front of the TV set, not the train set. In 1960, Walthers became a full-line distributor of other manufacturers' products while continuing expansion of the Walthers lines. By the start of the 1970's, business was booming again, and Bruce's son Phil joined the company.

Expansion and diversification continue under Phil's tenure. The establishment of the Walthers Importing Division added several international lines. The manufacturing plant was modernized. Code 83 track was introduced in 1985, giving layouts more realistic proportions. In 1990, the Cornerstone Series buildings were unveiled. Combining a freight car with a related industry, the Cornerstone Series makes it possible for modelers to duplicate authentic operations, enhancing layout realism. The Train Line Deluxe Sets and locomotives debuted in 1994. These sets feature the detailing of serious models and an affordable price -- allowing newcomers to get started, and then build-on to their first set, rather than replacing it.

In 2005, Walthers purchased Life-Like from Lifoam Industries. With this purchase Walthers acquired the Proto Lines that have become the backbone of their locomotive and rolling stock segments.

Today, Walthers continues to expand, improve and develop a wide range of products. Their latest selection can be found throughout Walthers.com and their printed catalogs, along with items from over 300 other manufacturers.


Item created by: gdm on 2016-10-20 14:56:20

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