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N Scale - Model Power - 3702 - Boxcar, 40 Foot, PS-1 - Great Northern

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N Scale - Model Power - 3702 - Boxcar, 40 Foot, PS-1 - Great Northern


N Scale - Model Power - 3702 - Boxcar, 40 Foot, PS-1 - Great Northern This item has an image gallery.
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An image of the prototype.


Brand Model Power
Stock Number 3702
Manufacturer Generic China
Body Style Chinese Generic Boxcar 40 Foot Steel
Road or Company Name Great Northern (Details)
Reporting Marks GN
Paint Color(s) Green and Orange
Print Color(s) 46006
Item Category Rolling Stock
Model Type Boxcar
Model Subtype 40 Foot
Model Variety Steel
Prototype Boxcar, 40 Foot, PS-1
Region North America
Era/Epoch Era III: 1939 - 1957


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Body Style Information: This Model Power tooling is a Chinese knock off of the New Jersey made 1976 vintage Atlas PS-1 boxcar. It was also imported by Life-Like. This model is of equivalent quality to the Atlas version (perhaps even sharper molding and lettering). It likely appeared in the late 1980s when Model Power contracted with Chinese manufacturers to replicate various successful toolings from Europe (Roco, Lima) and the US (Atlas). Like all of this group of models, these care feature Rapido couplers attached to trucks with injection-molded plastic wheels. Most of these models look fine on a modern layout and will run well once you swap the Chinese trucks for MTL Bettendorf truck/couplers.

Prototype Information: The 40' Boxcar is widely known as one of the most popular freight cars used by railroads as they transitioned from steam to diesel. In particular the Pullman Standard or PS-1 design was one of the most popular and was widely used by North American railroads. These boxcars were built beginning in 1947 and share the same basic design, with certain elements such as door size, door style or roof type varying among the different railroads and production years. When production of these cars ceased in 1963, over 100,000 had been produced.

So just what is a PS-1? Well the simple answer is it is any boxcar built by Pullman Standard from 1947 on. The design changed over the years – sometimes subtly, sometimes for customer request, and sometimes in a larger way. In general, most PS-1’s built from 1947 to 1961 share the same dimensions and basic construction techniques. These cars all had a length of 40′, a height of 10’5″ or 10’6″, welded sides and ends and roof of Pullman’s own design. The greatest variation was in the size and style of doors used. Pullman Standard also offered 50′ and later 60′ boxcars – also with the PS-1 designation.

Road/Company Information:
The Great Northern Railway (reporting mark GN) was an American Class I railroad. Running from Saint Paul, Minnesota, to Seattle, Washington, it was the creation of 19th century railroad entrepreneur James J. Hill and was developed from the Saint Paul & Pacific Railroad. The Great Northern's (GN) route was the northernmost transcontinental railroad route in the U.S.

The Great Northern was the only privately funded - and successfully built - transcontinental railroad in U.S. history. No federal land grants were used during its construction, unlike all other transcontinental railroads.

The Great Northern was built in stages, slowly to create profitable lines, before extending the road further into the undeveloped Western territories. In a series of the earliest public relations campaigns, contests were held to promote interest in the railroad and the ranchlands along its route. Fred J. Adams used promotional incentives such as feed and seed donations to farmers getting started along the line. Contests were all-inclusive, from largest farm animals to largest freight carload capacity and were promoted heavily to immigrants & newcomers from the East.

In 1970 the Great Northern, together with the Northern Pacific Railway, the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad and the Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway merged to form the Burlington Northern Railroad. The BN operated until 1996, when it merged with the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway to form the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
Founded in the late 1960's by Michael Tager, the 3rd generation business specializes in quality hobby products serving the toy and hobby markets worldwide. During its 50 years of operation, Model Power has developed a full line of model railroading products, die-cast metal aircraft, and die-cast metal cars and trucks.

In early 2014, Model Power ceased its business operations. Its extensive portfolio of intellectual property and physical assets are now exclusively produced, marketed, sold, and distributed by MRC (Model Power, MetalTrain and Mantua) and by Daron (Postage Stamp Airplanes and Airliner Collection).


Manufacturer Information:
Most Chinese copies are locked in to a single manufacturer. This means I cannot simply call the factory in China that makes Atlas GP9's and ask them to run them for me under my new company name 'TroveStar Model Trains'. In order to protect the IP of the vendor that commissioned the model, the various Chinese factories try (at least somewhat) to restrict who can make what.

There are exceptions. When Sanda Kan first started developing rolling stock for Life-Like in the late 1980s, no such protection existed. As result the exact same models being imported by Life-Like were also being imported by Industrial Rail (and possibly others). Life-Like was not the only importer to be burned like this. Model Power developed cars in China to duplicate rolling stock toolings made in Europe and the US only to see those same models get imported by Life-Like.

It is perhaps the case that Industrial Rail got permission to import the Sanda Kan models from Life-Like or that Life-Like go permission from Model Power to bring in the PS-1's but it seems more likely that the factory managers in Southern China got greedy. But, you never know.


Item created by: gdm on 2017-06-04 13:58:06

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