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Rail - Locomotive - Steam - 0-6-0 GWR Pannier Tank

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Rail - Locomotive - Steam - 0-6-0 GWR Pannier Tank
Name Locomotive, Steam, 0-6-0 GWR Pannier Tank
Region Europe
Category Rail
Type Locomotive
SubType Steam
Variety 0-6-0 GWR Pannier Tank
Manufacturer Great Western (Details)
Era UK Era 3: The Big Four (1923-1947)
Year(s) of Production 1929 - 1950


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History: The Great Western Railway (GWR) 5700 Class, or 57xx class, is a class of 0-6-0 pannier tank steam locomotive, built between 1929 and 1950. 863 were built, making them the most prolific class of the GWR, and one of the most numerous classes of British steam locomotive. Although officially designated by GWR as "light goods and shunting engines", they were also used for passenger working on branch, suburban, and shorter mainline journeys. They were distributed across most of the GWR network and, after nationalisation of the railways in 1948, across the British Railways Western Region, and also other regions. The 5700s were not as glamorous as the GWR Castles and Kings, but became just as much of an icon of the GWR. As a result of the 1955 Modernisation Plan, the 5700 Class was withdrawn from BR service between 1956 and 1966. Nineteen withdrawn locomotives were sold to London Transport and industry, of which ten were later preserved, along with six that were retrieved from scrapyards.

From Wikipedia

Railroad/Company:
The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company that linked London with the south-west and west of England, the Midlands, and most of Wales. It was founded in 1833, received its enabling Act of Parliament on 31 August 1835 and ran its first trains in 1838. It was engineered by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, who chose a broad gauge of 7 ft (2,134 mm)—later slightly widened to 7 ft 1⁄4 in (2,140 mm)—but, from 1854, a series of amalgamations saw it also operate 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard-gauge trains; the last broad-gauge services were operated in 1892. The GWR was the only company to keep its identity through the Railways Act 1921, which amalgamated it with the remaining independent railways within its territory, and it was finally merged at the end of 1947 when it was nationalised and became the Western Region of British Railways.

The GWR was called by some "God's Wonderful Railway" and by others the "Great Way Round" but it was famed as the "Holiday Line", taking many people to English and Bristol Channel resorts in the West Country as well as the far south-west of England such as Torquay in Devon, Minehead in Somerset, and Newquay and St Ives in Cornwall. The company's locomotives, many of which were built in the company's workshops at Swindon, were painted a Brunswick green colour while, for most of its existence, it used a two-tone "chocolate and cream" livery for its passenger coaches. Goods wagons were painted red but this was later changed to mid-grey.

Great Western trains included long-distance express services such as the Flying Dutchman, the Cornish Riviera Express and the Cheltenham Spa Express. It also operated many suburban and rural services, some operated by steam railmotors or autotrains. The company pioneered the use of larger, more economic goods wagons than were usual in Britain. It operated a network of road motor (bus) routes, was a part of the Railway Air Services, and owned ships, docks and hotels.

From Wikipedia


Item Links: We found: 1 different collections associated with Rail - Locomotive - Steam - 0-6-0 GWR Pannier Tank
Item created by: gdm on 2018-09-30 23:29:12. Last edited by gdm on 2018-09-30 23:30:06

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