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Rail - Rolling Stock (Freight) - Gondola - Evans 52 Foot

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Rail - Rolling Stock (Freight) - Gondola - Evans 52 Foot
Name Gondola, 52 Foot, Evans
Region North America
Category Rail
Type Rolling Stock (Freight)
SubType Gondola
Variety Evans 52 Foot
Manufacturer Evans Products (Details)
Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)



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History: In US railroad terminology, a gondola is an open-topped rail vehicle used for transporting loose bulk materials. Because of their low side walls gondolas are also suitable for the carriage of such high-density cargoes as steel plates or coils, or of bulky items such as prefabricated sections of rail track. For weather-sensitive loads, these gondolas are sometimes equipped with covers.

All-steel gondolas date back to the early part of the 20th century. However, most of the early ones were shorter, 40' designs. The ubiquitous 50' steel gondola we see modeled so often today is more along the lines of gondolas produced following the second world war when steel became once again readily available. Generally, they had a capacity of 70 tons and were 52'6" long. The first models of this design were produced by the Erie Railroad and the Greenville Steel Car Co, but nearly identical cars were produced by Pullman, ACF and Bethlehem.

Railroad/Company: Founded as U.S. Railway Equipment, or U.S. Railway Manufacturing, the name was changed to Evans Railcar Manufacturing in 1964. Evans Products Freight Cars built in the 1960's, 1970's, and 1980's were plentiful in the 1990's and many EP Freight Cars are still around. SIECO became one of their subsidiaries. Evans was purchased by GE Transportation sometime in the 1980s and transformed into a maintenance division.


Item Links: We found: 1 different collections associated with Rail - Rolling Stock (Freight) - Gondola - Evans 52 Foot
Item created by: gdm on 2018-11-09 13:21:15. Last edited by gdm on 2018-11-09 13:21:16

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