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N Scale - Atlas - 44718 - Engine, Diesel, U-25B - Family Lines - 1624

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N Scale - Atlas - 44718 - Engine, Diesel, U-25B - Family Lines - 1624 Phase IIb


Brand Atlas
Stock Number 44718
Original Retail Price $134.95
Manufacturer Atlas
Body Style Atlas Diesel Engine U25B
Road or Company Name Family Lines (Details)
Reporting Marks L&N
Road or Reporting Number 1624
Paint Color(s) Gray, Red, Yellow and White
Body Construction Plastic
DCC Readiness DC/DCC Dual Mode Decoder
Release Date 2006-07-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype GE Transportation
Model Variety U-25B
Prototype Engine, Diesel, U-25B
Region North America
Era/Epoch Era IV: 1958 - 1978


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Body Style Information: This model was first produced by Kato for Atlas in 1989. The model was retooled and production transferred to China in 1998. In 2003, the mechanism was updated again and a slow speed motor was introduced.

Although the retooling was performed in 1998, this model has all the features one would expect of a 2000's vintage design. A split-frame, flywheels, blackened wheels and body-mounted couplers. It runs quite well and can pull plenty of cars.

DCC Information: The early Kato models are all kinda-sorta DCC friendly, but IMHO, I wouldn't bother. Buy a new mechanism and drop your old shell on it. It will likely fit (no promises though!). All the 1998+ accept DCC boards and many come with factory-installed decoders. For the DCC-Ready versions, they accept the DN163A0 decoder: 1 Amp N Scale Mobile Decoder for Atlas N-Scale GP40-2, U25B, SD35, Trainmaster, B23-7 and others from digitrax.com.

Prototype Information: The GE U25B was General Electric's first independent entry into the United States domestic Diesel-electric locomotive railroad market for heavy production road locomotives since 1936. From 1940 through 1953, GE participated in a design, production, and marketing consortium (Alco-GE) for diesel-electric locomotives with the American Locomotive Company. Starting in 1956 GE launched its Universal Series of diesel locomotives for the export market. The U25B was the first attempt at the domestic market since its termination of the consortium agreement with Alco. From Wikipedia

Road/Company Information:
To be truthful the Family Lines System was never actually an operating railroad, it was merely a marketing tactic which brought together the allying lines of the Louisville & Nashville, Clinchfield, Seaboard Coast Line, and a number of other smaller road (such as the Georgia Railroad, Atlanta & West Point Railroad, and Western Railway of Alabama otherwise referred to as the West Point Route). With this came a new livery (not unlike the later Seaboard scheme) applied to all with sub-lettering stenciled under locomotive cabs identifying the specific company. This marketing scheme was also short-lived, lasting only from 1972 until 1982 when these railroads merged together formally to create the Seaboard System (itself operating for only a few years).

The three main components of the System were the L&N, Clinchfield, and SCL. The L&N (the first component) was a railroad synonymous with the southern states; it served major cities from New Orleans and Memphis to St. Louis, Atlanta, and later Chicago. The L&N is also one of the few classic fallen flags to never have had its original chartered name change at any point throughout its history, serving its home state and the southeast for over 120 years. As the L&N itself disappeared into the Seaboard System in 1982 just a few years later the Seaboard itself would disappear into CSX Transportation.

Brand/Importer Information:
In 1924 Stephan Schaffan, Sr. founded the Atlas Tool Company in Newark, New Jersey. In 1933 his son, Stephan Schaffan, Jr., came to work for his father at the age of sixteen. Steve Jr. built model airplanes as a hobby and frequented a local hobby shop. Being an enterprising young man, he would often ask the owner if there was anything he could do to earn some extra spending money. Tired of listening to his requests, the hobby-store owner threw some model railroad track parts his way and said, "Here, see if you can improve on this".

In those days, railroad modelers had to assemble and build everything from scratch. Steve Jr. created a "switch kit" which sold so well, that the entire family worked on them in the basement at night, while doing business as usual in the machine shop during the day.

Subsequently, Steve Jr. engineered the stapling of rail to fiber track, along with inventing the first practical rail joiner and pre-assembled turnouts and flexible track. All of these products, and more, helped to popularize model railroading and assisted in the creation of a mass-market hobby. The budding entrepreneur quickly outgrew the limitations of a basement and small garage operation. Realizing they could actually make a living selling track and related products, Steve and his father had the first factory built in Hillside, New Jersey at 413 Florence Avenue in 1947. On September 30, 1949, the Atlas Tool Company was officially incorporated as a New Jersey company.

In 1985, Steve was honored posthumously for his inventions by the Model Railroad Industry Association and was inducted into the Model Railroad Industry Hall of Fame in Baltimore, Maryland. In addition, Steve was nominated and entered into the National Model Railroad Association Pioneers of Model Railroading in 1995.

In the early 1990s, the Atlas Tool Company changed its name to Atlas Model Railroad Company, Inc.


Item created by: gdm on 2016-03-11 09:27:03. Last edited by gdm on 2017-05-05 15:29:20

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