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Aelius - Quinarius

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Ancient Coin - Aelius - Quinarius Bare Head Right / Felicitas Standing
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SubjectAelius
Reverse TypeFelicitas
DenominationQuinarius
Primary ID TypeRIC
Primary ID430
InscriptionObvL AELIVS CAESAR
InscriptionRevTR POT COS II
MaterialGold
Earliest137
Latest Possible Year137
MintRome
Weight (gr)139
PeriodImperial
CultureRome



Additional References: BMCRE Hadrian 968 and pl. 66, 14 (these dies); Cohen 51
Notes: Head bare right / Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus in right hand and cornucopiae in left.
Obverse: Lucius Aelius Caesar (January 13, 101 - January 1, 138) became the adopted son and intended successor of Roman Emperor Hadrian (January 24, 76 AD - July 10, 138 AD), but never attained the throne. Aelius was born with the name Lucius Ceionius Commodus, and later called Lucius Aelius Caesar. He is often mistakenly referred to as Lucius Aelius Verus, though this name is not attested outside the Augustan History and probably arose as a manuscript error.
Period: Imperial Rome. As the Roman Republic began to implode because of corruption and infighting among powerful members of the Roman Senate, a new type of Roman Republican coinage emerges, that of the military strongmen who dominated and fought among each other before the final fall of the Republic. The drama surrounding the fall of the Roman Republic is a story full of political intrigue, military action, betrayal, murder and sex scandals. Different parts of this story have been told and retold by ancient historians, modern day scholars, dozens of Hollywood movies and even an HBO miniseries. All of the actors in this great drama, Crassus, Pompey, Julius Caesar, Brutus and Cassius, Mark Antony and Cleopatra and the last man standing at the end of it all, Octavian (later known as the first emperor of Rome, Emperor Augustus) all minted coins during this time bearing their names and propaganda images supporting their factions and political ideals.
Culture: Ancient Rome. A famous catch phrase "Rome was not built in a day" definitely applies to the Roman civilization. Rome stated as a series of small villages among the famous seven hills of Rome along the river Tiber. Eventually through conquest, diplomacy, wise policies of indirect rule and assimilation, the Romans were able to not only unify the Italian peninsula, but though a series of brutal wars against regional powers established a great Empire that spanned Europe, Asia and Africa, making the Mediterrean Sea and "Roman Lake."

All Roman coinage can generally be divided into eight time periods as described below. An interesting thing about Roman coins minted during these eight time periods is that you can literally see the "Rise and Fall" of the Roman Empire on its coinage as the sharp imagery and pure silver and gold coins of the Roman Republic and Early Imperial Period gradually devolves into crude, illegible and heavily debased coins of the "Barracks Emperors" and "Barbarian" Period.
Item created by: gdm on 2016-08-14 14:04:38

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