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N Scale - Aztec - LW2030-2 - Boxcar, 50 Foot, Steel, Hi-Cube - Lamb Weston - 213

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One of these sold for: $10.00

N Scale - Aztec - LW2030-2 - Boxcar, 50 Foot, Steel, Hi-Cube - Lamb Weston  - 213 Image Courtesy of Elephant's Closet


N Scale - Aztec - LW2030-2 - Boxcar, 50 Foot, Steel, Hi-Cube - Lamb Weston  - 213 Image Courtesy of Elephant's Closet


Brand Aztec
Stock Number LW2030-2
Manufacturer MDC Roundhouse
Production Type Regular Production
Body Style MDC Boxcar 50 Foot Hi-Cube Plug Door
Prototype Boxcar, 50 Foot, Steel, Hi-Cube (Details)
Road or Company Name Lamb Weston (Details)
Reporting Marks XTRX
Road or Reporting Number 213
Paint Color(s) White
Print Color(s) Black
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Deep Flange
Body Material Plastic
Ready-to-Run No
Kit Complexity Easy-Build
Kit Material(s) Pewter Metal and Injection Molded Plastic
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Boxcar
Model Subtype 50 Foot
Model Variety Hi-Cube Plug Door
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era IV: 2nd Gen Diesel (1958 - 1978)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: This MDC Roundhouse body style models a 50 Foot Hi-Cube Boxcar with a single plug door, riveted sides and no roofwalk. the model is reasonably close in detail to a typical Plate-F prototype boxcar such as is made by Greenbrier. The molds were acquired by Athearn/Horizon Hobbies in 2006 and are being re-released with upgrades (body-mount couplers and metal wheelsets) as of late (2017).

Prototype History:
While the 40-foot boxcar was a standard design, and it did come in different setups depending on the type of freight being transported, it was not large enough for efficient mass commodity transportation. The 50-foot boxcar made its first appearance in the 1930s and steadily grew in popularity over the years, which further improved redundancies by allowing for even more space within a given car. Today, the 50-footer remains the common boxcar size. After the second world war ended, and steel became once again readily available, steel became the go-to choice for construction of boxcars. Pullman Standard and ACF were some of the most prolific builders of these cars.

In the 1960s, the flush, "plug" style sliding door was introduced as an option that provides a larger door to ease loading and unloading of certain commodities. The tight-fitting doors are better insulated and allow a car's interior to be maintained at a more even temperature.

The 50 foot hi-cube boxcar fleet is similar to a 50 foot standard car with an additional 2 feet of interior height. This is known as a "Plate F" boxcar. 50 foot Hi-Cube boxcars typically have a load capacity of 100 tons and are equipped with cushion underframes and plug doors. These cars are used primarily in rolled paper service as the extra height is needed to accommodate the larger rolls that are now commonplace. They can also be used for similar commodities handled in other 50’ or 60’ boxcars.


Road Name History:
In the Netherlands in 1920 Cees Meijer Sr. establishes a potato farm in Kruiningen, Zeeland (NL), growing excellent quality potatoes from the clay soil. The Dutch family firm is doing well. In the US it started in 1950. A grower called F. Gilbert ‘Gib’ Lamb opens a food processing company called Lamb Weston, in Weston, Oregon (US). He invents the water gun knife. This revolutionary invention is the world’s first cutting machine designed to cut fries under high water pressure. The company ventures beyond the traditional straight-cut French fry and introduces Twister® Fries, a curly shaped fry in 1983. One year later, CrissCut Fries appear, a unique specialty cut. Lamb Weston in the US has grown and is now a major player in potato processing.

Brand/Importer Information:
Aztec Manufacturing is an aftermarket decorator originally based in San Mateo, CA, now in Carson City, NV.
Historically, Aztec was known for their excellent quality aftermarket decorations of other manufacturers' rolling stock. Aztec repainted models by many different manufacturers including Life-Like, Atlas and others.
In the recent years, Aztec's focus is on track cleaning cars DCC-Ready frames for locomotives and high quality pad-printed freight cars.
Following retirement of its owner, Aztec closed its business in 2018.

Item created by: gdm on 2017-01-05 08:47:45. Last edited by gdm on 2020-05-18 08:53:11

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