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N Scale - Minitrix - 2001 - Locomotive, Diesel, Fairbanks Morse, H-12-44 - Conrail - 8416

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Stock Number 2001
Brand Minitrix
Manufacturer Minitrix
Body Style Minitrix Diesel Switcher Fairbanks Morse H-12-44
Prototype Vehicle Locomotive, Diesel, Fairbanks Morse, H-12-44 (Details)
Road or Company Name Conrail (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 8416
Paint Color(s) Blue
Print Color(s) White
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Standard
DCC Readiness No
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype Fairbanks-Morse
Model Variety H-12-44
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era NA Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Years Produced 1950-1961
Scale 1/160



Specific Item Information: Made in Western Germany and first sold in the US under the Postage Stamp Trains brand, the Minitrix EMD F9A/B, FM H12-44, GE U28C, and GE U30CG, diesels and the 0-6-0, 4-6-2, and 2-10-0 steam locomotives were initially imported by the Aurora Plastics Corp. in the late 1960s. Following Aurora's demise, American Tortoise, Con-Cor, and finally the now defunct Model Power resumed the importation and sales of these models. Sold by American Tortoise, the engine depicted here is now discontinued.

Prototype History:
The FM H-12-44 was a yard switcher produced by Fairbanks-Morse from May, 1950–March, 1961. The units featured a 1,200-horsepower (890 kW), six-cylinder opposed piston engine prime mover, and were configured in a B-B wheel arrangement mounted atop a pair of two-axle AAR Type-A switcher trucks, with all axles powered and geared for a top speed of 60 miles per hour (97 km/h).

A total of 303 units were built for American railroads, 30 were manufactured (between August 1951 to June 1956) by the Canadian Locomotive Company for use in Canada, and 1 unit was exported to Mexico.

Sixteen intact examples of the H-12-44 are known to survive today, all of which are owned by railroad museums or historical societies.

From Wikipedia
Read more on American-Rails.com

Full F-M H-12-44 data sheet on The Diesel Shop.

Road Name History:
The Consolidated Rail Corporation, commonly known as Conrail (reporting mark CR), was the primary Class I railroad in the Northeast U.S. between 1976 and 1999. Conrail is a portmanteau of "consolidated" and "rail" from the name of the company.

The U.S. federal government created Conrail to take over the potentially profitable lines of multiple bankrupt carriers, including the Penn Central Transportation Company and Erie Lackawanna Railway. With the benefit of industry-wide regulatory requirements being reduced (via the 4R Act and the Staggers Act), Conrail began to turn a profit in the 1980s and was turned over to private investors in 1987. The two remaining Class I railroads in the East, CSX Transportation and the Norfolk Southern Railway (NS), agreed in 1997 to split the system approximately equally, returning rail freight competition to the Northeast by essentially undoing the 1968 merger of the Pennsylvania Railroad and New York Central Railroad that created Penn Central. Following Surface Transportation Board approval, CSX and NS took control in August 1998, and on June 1, 1999, began operating their portions of Conrail.

Brand/Importer Information:
Trix is a German company that originally made Trix metal construction sets. one of its co-founders was Stephan Bing, the son of the pioneer toy-maker industrialist Ignaz Bing. In 1935 the company began producing the electrically powered model trains that it became famous for, under the Trix Express label. Prior to the outbreak of World War II the Trix company produced a small range of fairly unrealistic AC powered three rail models running at 14 volts.

N gauge models under the Minitrix brand were made from the late 1960s mostly of European prototypes (German and British primarily). North American prototypes were also manufactured and marketed under the Aurora "Postage Stamp" brand; later these items were sold under the American Tortoise, Model Power and Con-Cor brands. Trix sometimes utilized North American consultants to aid in the design of this portion of the product line. The "Hornby Minitrix' brand was used in the 1980s for a short lived range of British outline models using the earlier product tooling.

Trix's owner in the 1980s and 1990s was Mangold, which went bankrupt in the late 1990s and Märklin purchased the assets in January 1997. In part, this purchase was a reflection of Märklin's need for added production capacity; Trix had been manufacturing certain items for Märklin in previous years. The purchase was also in response to the earlier purchase of the Karl Arnold company by the Italian company Rivarossi; Märklin were very keen to take over Trix market share in 2-rail H0 and especially Minitrix, until then Märklin had not marketed N gauge models. In 2003, Märklin introduced its first N gauge models under the well established Minitrix brand. A number Märklin H0 scale three-rail AC locomotives have also been introduced in two-rail DC versions under the Trix logo and many models are shared between the two brands.

From Wikipedia

Item created by: RoadRailer on 2017-03-06 16:58:56. Last edited by gdm on 2021-05-22 01:40:26

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