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N Scale - Dream Designs - 001-002400 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD SW1500 - Southern Pacific - 1904

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N Scale - Dream Designs - 001-002400 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD SW1500 - Southern Pacific - 1904


Brand Dream Designs
Stock Number 001-002400
Original Retail Price $45.98
Manufacturer Rivarossi
Aftermarket Decorator Darren J Cohen
Body Style Rivarossi Diesel Switcher SW-1500/1200
Prototype Locomotive, Diesel, EMD SW1500 (Details)
Road or Company Name Southern Pacific (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 1904
Additional Markings/Slogan Los Angeles
Paint Color(s) Gray and Red
Print Color(s) White
Paint Scheme Bloody Nose
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Standard
DCC Readiness No
Release Date 1997-10-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype EMD
Model Variety SW1500
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era IV: 2nd Gen Diesel (1958 - 1978)
Years Produced 1966-1974
Scale 1/160



Specific Item Information: Painted by Darren J Cohen. Imported through Con-Cor.

Model Information: This model was first produced by Rivarossi for Atlas in 1971. After Atlas stopped ordering them, Con-Cor began importing the model. At a certain point, Con-Cor had Kato design a new, more reliable, mechanism but continued use of the Rivarossi shell. This new Kato/Rivarossi hybrid was produced until 1989. In 1996, Arnold/Rivarossi re-released the same model with yet another new mechanism. At this point Con-Cor released a new version of the model this time using a Chinese manufactured mechanism, but with the shell still more or less the same. These Chinese versions were marketed as SW-1200s. Con-Cor stopped making their version during the downsizing in 2005 and Arnold stopped producing theirs in 2006 with the bankruptcy.

The model was designed from early EMD drawings for this prototype, that were quite similar to the SW1200 drawings. Eventually the final prototype was released with significant changes to the early drawing. So though the model is sold as a SW1500, it is actually closer to a SW1200 than to a SW1500.

Review Courtesy of Doug Gosha: The Rivarossi model is a plastic shell and separate walkway molding over a zamac frame. There is an additional weight that fits into the cab portion of the shell. The same basic Rivarossi motor is used as in their other A1G locomotives but in a quite different configuration. In this case, the motor has a double-ended shaft with a worm on each end. Due to considerable space limitations in this small chassis, the worm diameters are much smaller than on the other Rivarossi A1G locos. The motor is kind of suspended under the zamac frame in an opening in the center with a spring sheet metal retainer that passes through holes in the top of the frame and snaps over the bushing extensions on the motor can and cap. The worms on the shaft then extend into openings in the bottom of the frame. The trucks are retained by plates mounted on the frame at each end with slots in them to engage bosses which extend from each side of the truck gearboxes. The left side plate at each end is insulated from the frame with a plastic spacer between it and the frame. A single screw through both plates and the frame hold them in place with an insulating washer on the left side.Wheel wipers are mounted on the gearboxes in the boss area and make contact with both the inner surface of each wheel and the retainer plates which gets current that far. Wires soldered to lugs under the left plate mounting screws carry current to the motor brush holder on the left (hot) side and the right (ground) brush holder has a flat spring which contacts the motor can and the can is grounded through the motor retainer. Because the right side truck retainer plates are also grounded to the frame, this completes the circuit. Actually, the wiring from the left side of the frame could go to either the right or left side of the motor depending on how the motor cap was installed in the factory since this would determine on which side the ground contact would be. In a departure from the past Rivarossi engines, there are no plastic traction tires used on this locomotive, Thus all eight wheels contribute to current collection with some sacrifice in pulling capacity. This little loco will still pull about 20 cars on level track!

DCC Information: No provision for DCC in any of these different versions.

Prototype History:
The EMD SW1500 was a 1,500 hp (1,119 kW) Diesel-electric locomotive intended for switching service and built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division between June 1966 and January 1974. 808 examples were constructed. It was closely related to the less powerful EMD SW1000 model, forming a line of switchers powered by the new EMD 645 engine. The SW1500 replaced the SW1200 in the EMD product line, and was in turn replaced by the MP15DC.

The SW1500 was a substantially bulkier locomotive than the SW1200, with a much bulkier frame, larger cab and bigger hood. In many respects it was approaching a road switcher in abilities. While the SW1500 came as standard with AAR switcher trucks, the majority of them were delivered with the optional Flexicoil trucks which permitted speeds up to 60 mph (100 km/h). The SW1500 was, in fact, often operated as a road-switcher for branchline service, and continues in this role today.

From Wikipedia

Road Name History:
The Southern Pacific Transportation Company (reporting mark SP), earlier Southern Pacific Railroad and Southern Pacific Company, and usually called the Southern Pacific or (from the railroad's initials) Espee, was an American Class I railroad. It was absorbed in 1988 by the company that controlled the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad and eight years later became part of the Union Pacific Railroad.

The railroad was founded as a land holding company in 1865, later acquiring the Central Pacific Railroad by lease. By 1900 the Southern Pacific Company was a major railroad system incorporating many smaller companies, such as the Texas and New Orleans Railroad and Morgan's Louisiana and Texas Railroad. It extended from New Orleans through Texas to El Paso, across New Mexico and through Tucson, to Los Angeles, through most of California, including San Francisco and Sacramento. Central Pacific lines extended east across Nevada to Ogden, Utah, and reached north through Oregon to Portland. Other subsidiaries eventually included the St. Louis Southwestern Railway (Cotton Belt), the Northwestern Pacific Railroad at 328 miles (528 km), the 1,331 miles (2,142 km) Southern Pacific Railroad of Mexico, and a variety of 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge routes.

In 1929 SP/T&NO operated 13848 route-miles not including Cotton Belt, whose purchase of the Golden State Route circa 1980 nearly doubled its size to 3,085 miles (4,965 km), bringing total SP/SSW mileage to around 13,508 miles (21,739 km).

By the 1980s route mileage had dropped to 10,423 miles (16,774 km), mainly due to the pruning of branch lines. In 1988 the Southern Pacific was taken over by D&RGW parent Rio Grande Industries. The combined railroad kept the Southern Pacific name due to its brand recognition in the railroad industry and with customers of both constituent railroads. Along with the addition of the SPCSL Corporation route from Chicago to St. Louis, the total length of the D&RGW/SP/SSW system was 15,959 miles (25,684 km).

By 1996 years of financial problems had dropped SP's mileage to 13,715 miles (22,072 km), and it was taken over by the Union Pacific Railroad.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Item created by: gdm on 2017-03-07 19:31:47. Last edited by Alain LM on 2018-04-17 06:55:30

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