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N Scale - Sylvan Scale Models - N-2003 - Stockbridge, MI, GTW Station - Grand Trunk Western

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N Scale - Sylvan Scale Models - N-2003 - Stockbridge, MI, GTW Station - Grand Trunk Western Sylvan Scale Models


Brand Sylvan Scale Models
Stock Number N-2003
Manufacturer Sylvan Scale Models
Production Type Regular Production
Body Style Sylvan Structure
Prototype Description Stockbridge, MI, GTW Station
Road or Company Name Grand Trunk Western (Details)
Paint Color(s) undecorated
Ready-to-Run No
Kit Complexity Craftsman
Kit Material(s) Cast Resin and Polystyrene
Item Category Structures
Model Type Buildings
Model Subtype Railroad
Model Variety Station



Model Information: Structure kits

Road Name History:
The Grand Trunk Western dates from 1928 as part of the Canadian government’s process of nationalizing some major Canadian railroads (under the name Canadian National) including the Grand Trunk Railway which had built the line. The GT lines in Michigan, Indiana and Illinois were combined under the Grand Trunk Western banner. The GTW linked the Canadian border at Port Huron (north of Detroit, Michigan) with Chicago via Durand, Lansing, and South Bend. There were also routes to Detroit, Pontiac, Bay City, Carson City, and the Lake Michigan car ferry port of Muskegon (with ferry service to Wisconsin where GTW maintained a small yard and stationed a switcher.) The GTW had about 1,000 route miles during this period. So, the GTW was an American railroad that was a wholly owned subsidiary of a Canadian corporation, wholly owned by the Canadian government. In 1970, GTW was made a subsidiary of Grand Trunk Corporation (still wholly owned by CN) which also held sister roads Central Vermont, Duluth Winnipeg & Pacific and Grand Trunk (which operated in New York and New England.) This was done to give CN’s american employees more opportunities to advance in the organization.

The GTW steam fleet looked very much like what you would see on the CN but GTW’s engines were built in the U.S. by Alco, Lima, and Baldwin. A fleet of 58 Alco built Mikes handled the prime road freight assignments until augmented by 43 4-8-4’s from Alco and Lima. Parent CN also relied heavily on 4-8-4’s so this was not a surprise. The last of these was delivered in 1944. Despite picking up F units and geeps for freight service early on, GTW was late to retire steam. The last run (in passenger service no less) was in 1960!

The first generation of diesels included F’s and GP9’s (set up long hood forward as on parent CN) followed by GP18’s for freight service. GTW went to EMD and Alco for switchers. Road units were painted in a green and gold scheme essentially the same as that of CN but with their own lettering and logos.

In 1962, GTW adopted a new “noodle” logo using the letters GT to conform to CN’s own noodle logo adopted two years before. Locomotives were painted black with Morency Orange ends (later replaced with red) with light gray frame stripes and lettering. Cab units received the familiar “sergeant stripe” scheme used on CN. GTW’s second generation of diesels (which also introduced the switch to low short hoods and running short-hood-forward) began in 1969 with the delivery of SD40’s followed by GP38AC and GP38-2 models. In December of 1971, GTW switched from black to blue with red ends and white frame stripe and lettering.

In addition to acting as a link from Chicago to eastern Canada, GTW was also an important carrier for the auto industry. Their freight car fleet included large numbers of auto parts boxcars and auto racks. In the early 70’s, GTW adopted the motto, “the Good Track road” on their freight cars to set them apart from their derailment prone neighbor Penn Central.

In 1980, GTW acquired another railroad critical to the auto industry, the Detroit Toledo & Ironton. This gave GTW routes from Detroit to the Ohio River. A year later, they acquired Norfolk & Western’s half of the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line, merging that small bridge line connecting Detroit with Toledo.

At this point, GTW was over 1,500 miles long with 262 diesels and nearly 12,000 cars. In 1995, GTW’s parent Canadian National was privatized, at which point there was less need for the US subsidiaries to have distinctly separate identities. Grand Trunk Western continues as a “paper railroad” but operations on these lines are now run as part of the greater Canadian National system.

Manufacturer Information:
We welcome this opportunity to introduce you to our company, Sylvan Scale Models™. Our factory is located in a small hamlet 35 minutes north-west of London, Ontario, Canada. We manufacture fine quality cast polyurethane resin model railroad kits, which are prototypically accurate and finely detailed.

Sylvan Scale Models™ is owned by Clare Gilbert. Clare has been active in the model railroad hobby for over 25 years. Clare’s models have won him many awards at shows, and he has four certificates so far in the MMR program.

Clare has had articles published in Canadian Railway Modeller, NMRA Bulletin, and other periodicals. He is also the author of the book The St. Clair Tunnel: Rails Beneath the River, published by Boston Mills Press.

In addition to manufacturing cast resin model railroad kits, Sylvan Scale Models™ has built custom models for corporate customers, including Canadian National Railways, Toronto Transit Commission, Lovat Tunnel, Union Gas, Railworld Inc., Sifton Properties (London), Trojan Technologies Inc., GATX, and Freightcar America (formerly Johnstown America). Both floors of our shop have now been put into use, to meet the increasing demand for our products.

Item created by: Powderman on 2017-12-26 17:56:47. Last edited by gdm on 2020-06-03 17:59:10

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