Search:
Type the text to search here
and press Enter.
This will search in all fields
of the database.

Click on Search: to go to the advanced search page.

N Scale - Broadway Limited - 3528 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD F7 - Pennsylvania - 9673A

Please help support TroveStar. Why?

N Scale - Broadway Limited - 3528 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD F7 - Pennsylvania - 9673A similar but different road number


Brand Broadway Limited
Stock Number 3528
Original Retail Price $229.99
Manufacturer Broadway Limited Imports
Production Type Regular Production
Body Style Broadway Limited Diesel Engine F7 (A & B Units)
Prototype Locomotive, Diesel, EMD F7 (Details)
Road or Company Name Pennsylvania (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 9673A
Paint Color(s) Green and Yellow
Print Color(s) Yellow
Paint Scheme DGLE Single Stripe
Coupler Type MT Magne-Matic Knuckle
Wheel Type Chemically Blackened Metal
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Body Material Plastic
DCC Readiness DC/DCC Dual Mode Decoder w/Sound
Release Date 2015-09-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype EMD
Model Variety F7A
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: The F7 was the fourth model in GM-EMDs successful line of F unit locomotives, and by far the best-selling cab unit of all time. In fact, more F7s were built than all other F units combined. It succeeded the F3 model in GM-EMDs F unit sequence, and was replaced in turn by the F9. Final assembly was at GM-EMDs La Grange, Illinois plant or GMDs London, Ontario facility. The F7 differed from the F3 primarily in internal equipment (mostly electrical) and some external features. Its continuous tractive effort rating was 20% higher (e.g. 40,000 lb (18,000 kg) for an F7 with 65 mph (105 km/h) gearing, compared to 32,500 lb (14,700 kg) for an F3 with the same gearing.) A total of 2,366 cab-equipped lead A units and 1,483 cabless-booster or B units were built. (Note: the B unit is often referred to as an F7B, whereas the A unit is simply an F7. For clarity, BLI refers to A units as F7A.) Many F7s remained in service for decades, as railroads found them economical to operate and maintain. However, the locomotive was not very popular with yard crews who operated them in switching service because they were difficult to mount and dismount, and it was also nearly impossible for the engineer to see hand signals from a ground crew without leaning way outside the window. As most of these engines were bought and operated before two-way radio became standard on most American railroads, this was a major point of contention. In later years, with the advent of the road switchers such as the EMD GP7, F units were primarily used in through freight and unit train service where there was very little or no switching to be done on that line of road.

DCC Information: Paragon3 Sound & Operation System FEATURING ROLLING THUNDER
  • Operates in DC & DCC (use DCMaster for DC Sound)
  • Record & Play Operation - Records and plays back sounds and movements once or repeatedly for automatic operation
  • 16-bit Sample Rate for exceptional high frequency sound clarity
  • Alternate Whistle / Horn where applicable for locomotive with air horn and steam whistle - both the main whistle and alternate can be easily played
  • Adjustable bell ringing interval for faster or slower bell
  • Numerous user-mappable functions with available keys
  • Passenger Station Ambient Sounds - Controlled with Function Key
  • Freight Yard related radio chatter - Controlled with Function Key
  • Lumber Yard Ambient Sounds - Controlled with Function Key
  • Farm related radio chatter - Controlled with Function Key
  • Crew Radio Communications - Controlled with Function Key
  • Maintenance Yard related radio chatter - Controlled with Function Key
  • Demo Mode for display and demonstrations
  • Simple Programming with Integral DCC Decoder
  • Individually adjustable sound volumes for most effects

  • Prototype History:
    The F7 was the fourth model in GM-EMD's successful line of F unit locomotives, and by far the best-selling cab unit of all time. In fact, more F7's were built than all other F units combined. It succeeded the F3 model in GM-EMD's F unit sequence, and was replaced in turn by the F9. Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois, plant or GMD's London, Ontario, facility.

    The F7 differed from the F3 primarily in internal equipment (mostly electrical) and some external features. Its continuous tractive effort rating was 20% higher (e.g. 40,000 lb (18,000 kg) for an F7 with 65 mph (105 km/h) gearing, compared to 32,500 lb (14,700 kg) for an F3 with the same gearing.

    A total of 2,366 cab-equipped lead A units and 1,483 cabless-booster or B units were built. (Note: the B unit is often referred to as an "F7B", whereas the A unit is simply an "F7".)

    Many F7s remained in service for decades, as railroads found them economical to operate and maintain. However, the locomotive was not very popular with yard crews who operated them in switching service because they were difficult to mount and dismount, and it was also nearly impossible for the engineer to see hand signals from a ground crew without leaning way outside the window. As most of these engines were bought and operated before two-way radio became standard on most American railroads, this was a major point of contention. In later years, with the advent of the "road switchers" such as the EMD GP7, F units were primarily used in "through freight" and "unit train" service where there was very little or no switching to be done on line of road.

    From Wikipedia
    Read more on American-Rails.com

    Road Name History:
    The Pennsylvania Railroad (reporting mark PRR) was an American Class I railroad, founded in 1846. Commonly referred to as the "Pennsy," the PRR was headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

    The PRR was the largest railroad by traffic and revenue in the U.S. for the first half of the twentieth century. Over the years, it acquired, merged with or owned part of at least 800 other rail lines and companies. At the end of 1925, it operated 10,515 miles of rail line; in the 1920s, it carried nearly three times the traffic as other railroads of comparable length, such as the Union Pacific or Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroads. Its only formidable rival was the New York Central (NYC), which carried around three-quarters of PRR's ton-miles.

    At one time, the PRR was the largest publicly traded corporation in the world, with a budget larger than that of the U.S. government and a workforce of about 250,000 people. The corporation still holds the record for the longest continuous dividend history: it paid out annual dividends to shareholders for more than 100 years in a row.

    In 1968, PRR merged with rival NYC to form the Penn Central Transportation Company, which filed for bankruptcy within two years. The viable parts were transferred in 1976 to Conrail, which was itself broken up in 1999, with 58 percent of the system going to the Norfolk Southern Railway (NS), including nearly all of the former PRR. Amtrak received the electrified segment east of Harrisburg.

    Read more on Wikipedia.

    Brand/Importer Information:
    Broadway Limited Imports, LLC defines itself as "the world's foremost producer of top-quality HO and N scale model trains".

    Broadway Limited Imports is composed of a team of 15 fun loving individuals who are dedicated to creating the most realistic model railroading experience possible, with the best customer service possible.

    The Broadway Limited Imports headquarters is located in Ormond Beach, Florida at 9 East Tower Circle. It's just under an hour's drive from Disney World.

    About Broadway Limited Imports.

    Item created by: Powderman on 2018-01-28 16:51:42. Last edited by gdm on 2018-06-07 10:23:32

    If you see errors or missing data in this entry, please feel free to log in and edit it. Anyone with a Gmail account can log in instantly.