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N Scale - Life-Like - 920-90023 - Locomotive, Steam, 0-8-0 USRA - Louisville & Nashville - 2118

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N Scale - Life-Like - 920-90023 - Locomotive, Steam, 0-8-0 USRA - Louisville & Nashville - 2118 Image Courtesy of Wm. K. Walthers


N Scale - Life-Like - 920-90023 - Locomotive, Steam, 0-8-0 USRA - Louisville & Nashville - 2118


Brand Life-Like
Stock Number 920-90023
Original Retail Price $174.98
Manufacturer Walthers
Production Type Regular Production
Image Provider's Website Link
Body Style Life-Like Steam Engine 0-8-0 USRA
Prototype Type Locomotive, Steam, 0-8-0 USRA (Details)
Road or Company Name Louisville & Nashville (Details)
Reporting Marks L&N
Road or Reporting Number 2118
Paint Color(s) Black
Print Color(s) Yellow
Coupler Type AccuMate Magnetic Knuckle
Coupler Mount Body-Mount
Wheel Type Chemically Blackened Metal
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
DCC Readiness Ready
Announcement Date 2007-08-23
Release Date 2008-01-31
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Steam
Model Subtype 0-8-0
Model Variety USRA
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era II: Late Steam (1901 - 1938)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: Model introduced in 2007 in the Heritage N Scale Steam Collection and re-run in 2008.
Features:
  • All Drivers Geared
  • Traction Tires for Superior Pulling Power
  • All-Wheel Electrical Pickup on Loco & Tender
  • Flywheel Equipped for Smooth Operation
  • Constant Intensity & Directional LED Headlights
  • RP-25 Contour Wheels
  • Operates on All Brands of Code 55 or Larger Rail
  • Heavy Diecast, Split-Frame Chassis
  • Three-Pole Skew-Wound Motor

DCC Information: DCC Ready – NMRA 8-pin / NEM 652 Socket in Tender

Prototype History:
The USRA 0-8-0 was a USRA standard class of steam locomotive designed under the control of the United States Railroad Administration, the nationalized railroad system in the United States during World War I. This was the standard heavy switcher of the USRA types, and was of 0-8-0 wheel arrangement in the Whyte notation, or "D" in UIC classification.
A total of 175 locomotives were built, under USRA control, by ALCO, Baldwin and Lima for many different railroads in the United States. After the dissolution of the USRA in 1920, an additional 1,200 examples of the USRA 0-8-0 were built for many railroads.

The last steam locomotive to be built in the USA for a Class I railroad was 0-8-0 no. 244, a Class S1a switch engine erected by the Norfolk and Western Roanoke shop in December 1953.

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-8-0 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles and no trailing wheels. Locomotives of this type are also referred to as eight coupled..

Examples of the 0-8-0 wheel arrangement were constructed both as tender and tank locomotives. The earliest locomotives were built for mainline haulage, particularly for freight, but the configuration was later also often used for large switcher (shunter) types. The wheel arrangement provided a powerful layout with all engine weight as adhesive weight, which maximised the tractive effort and factor of adhesion. The layout was generally too large for smaller and lighter railways, where the more popular 0-6-0 wheel arrangement would often be found performing similar duties.

From Wikipedia

Road Name History:
The Louisville and Nashville Railroad (reporting mark LN), commonly called the L&N, was a Class I railroad that operated freight and passenger services in the southeast United States.

Chartered by the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1850, the road grew into one of the great success stories of American business. Operating under one name continuously for 132 years, it survived civil war and economic depression and several waves of social and technological change. Under Milton H. Smith, president of the company for thirty years, the L&N grew from a road with less than three hundred miles (480 km) of track to a 6,000-mile (9,700 km) system serving thirteen states. As one of the premier Southern railroads, the L&N extended its reach far beyond its namesake cities, stretching to St. Louis, Memphis, Atlanta, and New Orleans. The railroad was economically strong throughout its lifetime, operating both freight and passenger trains in a manner that earned it the nickname, "The Old Reliable."

Growth of the railroad continued until its purchase and the tumultuous rail consolidations of the 1980s which led to continual successors. By the end of 1970, L&N operated 6,063 miles (9,757 km) of road on 10,051 miles (16,176 km) of track, not including the Carrollton Railroad.

In 1971 the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad, successor to the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, purchased the remainder of the L&N shares it did not already own, and the company became a subsidiary. By 1982 the railroad industry was consolidating quickly, and the Seaboard Coast Line absorbed the Louisville & Nashville Railroad entirely. Then in 1986, the Seaboard System merged with the C&O and B&O and the new combined system was known as the Chessie System. Soon after the combined company became CSX Transportation (CSX), which now owns and operates all of the former Louisville and Nashville lines.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
Life-Like Products LLC (now Life-Like Toy and Hobby division of Wm. K. Walthers) was a manufacturer of model railroad products and was based in Baltimore, Maryland.

It was founded in the 1950s by a company that pioneered extruded foam ice chests under the Lifoam trademark. Because ice chests are a summer seasonal item, the company needed a way to keep the factory operating year round. As model railroading was becoming popular in the post-war years, they saw this as an opportunity and so manufactured extruded foam tunnels for model trains. Over the years, Life-Like expanded into other scenery items, finally manufacturing rolling stock beginning in the late 1960s. At some point in the early 1970s, Life-Like purchased Varney Inc. and began to produce the former Varney line as its own.

The Canadian distributor for Life-Like products, Canadian Hobbycraft, saw a missing segment in market for Canadian model prototypes, and started producing a few Canadian models that were later, with a few modifications, offered in the US market with US roadnames.

In 2005, the company, now known as Lifoam Industries, LLC, decided to concentrate on their core products of extruded foam and sold their model railroad operations to Wm. K. Walthers.

In June 2018, Atlas and Walthers announced to have reached an agreement under which all Walthers N scale rolling stock tooling, including the former Life-Like tooling, will be purchased by Atlas.

Read more on Wikipedia and The Train Collectors Association.

Item created by: Alain LM on 2019-02-24 12:23:13. Last edited by Alain LM on 2020-12-13 08:49:23

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