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N Scale - Atlas - 50 004 872 - Flatcar, Bulkhead Pulpwood - Southern - 141125

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N Scale - Atlas -  50 004 872 - Flatcar, Bulkhead Pulpwood - Southern - 141125 Image Courtesy of Atlas Model Railroad


Brand Atlas
Stock Number 50 004 872
Original Retail Price $29.95
Manufacturer Atlas
Production Type Announced
Image Provider's Website Link
Body Style Walthers 50' Pulpwood Car
Prototype Flatcar, Bulkhead Pulpwood (Details)
Road or Company Name Southern (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 141125
Paint Color(s) Brown
Print Color(s) White
Coupler Type AccuMate Magnetic Knuckle
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Body Material Plastic
Announcement Date 2019-02-01
Release Date 2019-07-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Flatcar
Model Subtype 50 Foot
Model Variety Pulpwood
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: Introduced in December 1998, with a second limited run in 2010.
Originally referred to by Walthers as 60' Pulpwood cars (60'=total length), they were later called 50' Pulpwood cars (50'=interior length).
Ready-to-run, the model features a heavy die-cast body, styrene details, free-rolling trucks and standard (Rapido) couplers - Accumate couplers for the second run.
Available in singles for $8.98 or in 3-packs for $26.98.

Re-run under Atlas brand in 2019 after Atlas purchased the tooling from Walthers.

Matching pulpwood load: Walthers 933-800

Here is how Walthers described them:
Pulpwood is an important source of fiber for making paper. Walthers ready-to-run Pulpwood Car is a southern style car constructed by SIECO (Southern Iron & Equipment Co.) beginning in the 1960s.
It carries loads of wood cut about four feet long, and stacked into the "V" sloped floors of the car, where each side holds the other in place.
Walthers advertised concurrently its Superior Paper Company (933-3237), with these words "Seen wherever pulpwood moves to paper mills, these cars are just the ticket for moving raw materials to the Superior Paper Co".

Prototype History:
Pulpwood is not a specific type of wood, but actually tree limbs that are cut to a specified length, then turned into wood pulp and used in the paper industry. Early paper making had the trees near the paper plant. As timber resources were diminished, the need for transporting pulpwood began to rise. Railroads were seen as an efficient method of transporting pulpwood. Pulpwood in the Southeast and Northeast is generally cut into four-foot or less lengths and loaded onto "V-deck" bulkhead flat cars.
In the early 1950s General Steel Castings, produced a "V-deck" design.
Another notable manufacturer of pulpwood flat cars was the Southern Iron & Equipment Company (SIECO) that manufactured this type of car in the 1960s and 1970s, with over 800 delivered in the early 1979’s to the Southern Railway, alone.

Road Name History:
The Southern Railway (reporting mark SOU) (also known as Southern Railway Company) was a US class 1 railroad that was based in the Southern United States. It was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined beginning in the 1830s, formally becoming the Southern Railway in 1894.

At the end of 1970 Southern operated 6,026 miles (9,698 km) of railroad, not including its Class I subsidiaries AGS (528 miles or 850 km) CofG (1729 miles) S&A (167 miles) CNOTP (415 miles) GS&F (454 miles) and twelve Class II subsidiaries. That year Southern itself reported 26111 million net ton-miles of revenue freight and 110 million passenger-miles; AGS reported 3854 and 11, CofG 3595 and 17, S&A 140 and 0, CNO&TP 4906 and 0.3, and GS&F 1431 and 0.3

The railroad joined forces with the Norfolk and Western Railway (N&W) in 1982 to form the Norfolk Southern Corporation. The Norfolk Southern Corporation was created in response to the creation of the CSX Corporation (its rail system was later transformed to CSX Transportation in 1986). The Southern Railway was renamed Norfolk Southern Railway in 1990 and continued under that name ever since. Seven years later in 1997 the railroad absorbed the Norfolk and Western Railway, ending the Norfolk and Western's existence as an independent railroad.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
In 1924 Stephan Schaffan, Sr. founded the Atlas Tool Company in Newark, New Jersey. In 1933 his son, Stephan Schaffan, Jr., came to work for his father at the age of sixteen. Steve Jr. built model airplanes as a hobby and frequented a local hobby shop. Being an enterprising young man, he would often ask the owner if there was anything he could do to earn some extra spending money. Tired of listening to his requests, the hobby-store owner threw some model railroad track parts his way and said, "Here, see if you can improve on this".

In those days, railroad modelers had to assemble and build everything from scratch. Steve Jr. created a "switch kit" which sold so well, that the entire family worked on them in the basement at night, while doing business as usual in the machine shop during the day.

Subsequently, Steve Jr. engineered the stapling of rail to fiber track, along with inventing the first practical rail joiner and pre-assembled turnouts and flexible track. All of these products, and more, helped to popularize model railroading and assisted in the creation of a mass-market hobby. The budding entrepreneur quickly outgrew the limitations of a basement and small garage operation. Realizing they could actually make a living selling track and related products, Steve and his father had the first factory built in Hillside, New Jersey at 413 Florence Avenue in 1947. On September 30, 1949, the Atlas Tool Company was officially incorporated as a New Jersey company.

In 1985, Steve was honored posthumously for his inventions by the Model Railroad Industry Association and was inducted into the Model Railroad Industry Hall of Fame in Baltimore, Maryland. In addition, Steve was nominated and entered into the National Model Railroad Association Pioneers of Model Railroading in 1995.

In the early 1990s, the Atlas Tool Company changed its name to Atlas Model Railroad Company, Inc.

Item created by: scottakoltz on 2019-03-21 13:35:27. Last edited by scottakoltz on 2020-06-04 13:45:07

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