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N Scale - Atlas - 50 005 126 - Passenger Car, Heavyweight, ACF Coach - Chicago Great Western - 5-Pack

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N Scale - Atlas - 50 005 126 - Passenger Car, Heavyweight, ACF Coach - Chicago Great Western - 5-Pack Image Courtesy of Atlas Model Railroad


Brand Atlas
Stock Number 50 005 126
Original Retail Price $184.95
Manufacturer Atlas
Production Type Regular Production
Image Provider's Website Link
Body Style Atlas Passenger Car ACF 60 Foot Box Set
Prototype Vehicle Passenger Car, Heavyweight, ACF Coach (Details)
Road or Company Name Chicago Great Western (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 5-Pack
Paint Color(s) Maroon, Orange & Gold
Print Color(s) Gold
Coupler Type AccuMate Magnetic Knuckle
Coupler Mount Body-Mount
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Multipack Yes
Multipack Count 5
Multipack ID Number 50005126
Announcement Date 2019-04-15
Item Category Passenger Cars
Model Type Heavyweight
Model Subtype ACF
Model Variety Mixed
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era II: Late Steam (1901 - 1938)
Scale 1/160



Specific Item Information: BAGGAGE #46, RPO #66, COMBINE #282, COACH #280, OBSERVATION #99 • Based upon C&NW and CNJ prototypes • Full scale dimensions and details • All cars include separately applied window glazing, diaphragms and roof vents • Detailed interiors • AccuMate® operating knuckle couplers

Prototype History:
Heavyweight refers to early 20th century cars built before the late 1930s. They were usually of riveted steel construction with 6 wheel trucks (not always) and often (not always) had large clerestory (learn more about clerestory roofs in our blog: What is a Monitor Roof Passenger Car?) or arch roofs that tapered or curved at the ends. Heavyweights were built with a heavy under frame to hold the car body. The floor was often of poured concrete, which helped give these cars a smoother ride than older wooden-body cars. The rest of the car was built on top of the frame and was structurally irrelevant. Heavyweight passenger cars weigh around 1 ton per foot of length. So a 85' car weighs in the area of 85 tons. Some railroads 'rebuilt' older heavyweight cars with new low profile roofs, thermopane windows, and flashy paint schemes to match the newer lightweights.

Road Name History:
The Chicago Great Western Railway (reporting mark CGW) was a Class I railroad that linked Chicago, Minneapolis, Omaha, and Kansas City. It was founded by Alpheus Beede Stickney in 1885 as a regional line between St. Paul and the Iowa state line called the Minnesota and Northwestern Railroad. Through mergers and new construction, the railroad, named Chicago Great Western after 1892, quickly became a multi-state carrier. One of the last Class I railroads to be built, it competed against several other more well-established railroads in the same territory, and developed a corporate culture of innovation and efficiency to survive.

Nicknamed the Corn Belt Route because of its operating area in the midwestern United States, the railroad was sometimes called the Lucky Strike Road, due to the similarity in design between the herald of the CGW and the logo used for Lucky Strike cigarettes.

In 1968 it merged with the Chicago and North Western Railway (CNW), which abandoned most of the CGW's trackage.

Brand/Importer Information:
In 1924 Stephan Schaffan, Sr. founded the Atlas Tool Company in Newark, New Jersey. In 1933 his son, Stephan Schaffan, Jr., came to work for his father at the age of sixteen. Steve Jr. built model airplanes as a hobby and frequented a local hobby shop. Being an enterprising young man, he would often ask the owner if there was anything he could do to earn some extra spending money. Tired of listening to his requests, the hobby-store owner threw some model railroad track parts his way and said, "Here, see if you can improve on this".

In those days, railroad modelers had to assemble and build everything from scratch. Steve Jr. created a "switch kit" which sold so well, that the entire family worked on them in the basement at night, while doing business as usual in the machine shop during the day.

Subsequently, Steve Jr. engineered the stapling of rail to fiber track, along with inventing the first practical rail joiner and pre-assembled turnouts and flexible track. All of these products, and more, helped to popularize model railroading and assisted in the creation of a mass-market hobby. The budding entrepreneur quickly outgrew the limitations of a basement and small garage operation. Realizing they could actually make a living selling track and related products, Steve and his father had the first factory built in Hillside, New Jersey at 413 Florence Avenue in 1947. On September 30, 1949, the Atlas Tool Company was officially incorporated as a New Jersey company.

In 1985, Steve was honored posthumously for his inventions by the Model Railroad Industry Association and was inducted into the Model Railroad Industry Hall of Fame in Baltimore, Maryland. In addition, Steve was nominated and entered into the National Model Railroad Association Pioneers of Model Railroading in 1995.

In the early 1990s, the Atlas Tool Company changed its name to Atlas Model Railroad Company, Inc.

Item created by: scottakoltz on 2019-04-23 10:30:35. Last edited by scottakoltz on 2020-06-01 16:17:04

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