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Atlas - 40 003 765 - Phase 2 - Pennsylvania - 2234

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N Scale - Atlas - 40 003 765 - Phase 2 - Pennsylvania - 2234 Image Courtesy of Atlas Model Railroad
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Stock Number40 003 765
Original Retail Price$129.95
BrandAtlas
ManufacturerAtlas
Body StyleAtlas Diesel Engine GP30
Image Provider's WebsiteLink
Prototype VehicleLocomotive, Diesel, EMD GP30 (Details)
PrototypePhase 2
Road or Company NamePennsylvania (Details)
Reporting MarksPRR
Road or Reporting Number2234
Paint Color(s)Brunswick Green
Print Color(s)Yellow, Red, White
Coupler TypeAccuMate Magnetic Knuckle
Coupler MountBody-Mount
Wheel TypeChemically Blackened Metal
Wheel ProfileSmall Flange (Low Profile)
Series NameSilver Series
DCC ReadinessSound Ready
Release Date2020-03-22
Item CategoryLocomotives
Model TypeDiesel
Model SubtypeEMD
Model VarietyGP30 Phase 2
Prototype RegionNorth America
Prototype EraNA Era IV: 2nd Gen Diesel (1958 - 1978)
Scale1/160



Series Information: Atlas MasterĀ® Silver version is Sound Ready and equipped with speaker for easy conversion to DCC sound.
Model Information: The first version of this engine was made by Roco for Atlas in 1974. These Austrian-made locomotives were available through the early 1980s. Then, in 1992 Atlas contracted with Kato in Japan to produce a new release of this model. Finally, Atlas switched to Chinese Manufacturing in 1997. They then retooled the Chinese version of the engine for DCC in 2006. The original Kato versions are solid runners with flywheels and body-mounted (Rapido) couplers. They also carry low-profile wheels. Some of the later Rapido-equipped models are easy to swap to MTL couplers by removing a simple plastic clip.

The newest versions are modern split-frame designs with flywheels and a "slow speed" motor with "white" LED lights.
DCC Information: Older versions of this model require a lot of love to make them work with DCC.

Newer models, from 2006 on, accept 1.5 Amp N Scale Board Replacement Mobile Decoder for Atlas GP30 (DN163A4) from Digitrax.com. Be sure that you have one of the newer models in hand before ordering a decoder such as this one.
Prototype History:
The EMD GP30 is a 2,250 hp (1,680 kW) four-axle B-B diesel-electric locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division of La Grange, Illinois between July 1961 and November 1963. A total of 948 units were built for railroads in the United States and Canada (2 only), including 40 cabless B units for the Union Pacific Railroad.

It was the first so-called "second generation" EMD diesel locomotive, and was produced in response to increased competition by a new entrant, General Electric's U25B, which was released roughly at the same time as the GP30. The GP30 is easily recognizable due to its high profile and stepped cab roof, unique among American locomotives. A number are still in service today in original or rebuilt form.

From Wikipedia
Road Name History:
The Pennsylvania Railroad (reporting mark PRR) was an American Class I railroad, founded in 1846. Commonly referred to as the "Pennsy," the PRR was headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The PRR was the largest railroad by traffic and revenue in the U.S. for the first half of the twentieth century. Over the years, it acquired, merged with or owned part of at least 800 other rail lines and companies. At the end of 1925, it operated 10,515 miles of rail line; in the 1920s, it carried nearly three times the traffic as other railroads of comparable length, such as the Union Pacific or Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroads. Its only formidable rival was the New York Central (NYC), which carried around three-quarters of PRR's ton-miles.

At one time, the PRR was the largest publicly traded corporation in the world, with a budget larger than that of the U.S. government and a workforce of about 250,000 people. The corporation still holds the record for the longest continuous dividend history: it paid out annual dividends to shareholders for more than 100 years in a row.

In 1968, PRR merged with rival NYC to form the Penn Central Transportation Company, which filed for bankruptcy within two years. The viable parts were transferred in 1976 to Conrail, which was itself broken up in 1999, with 58 percent of the system going to the Norfolk Southern Railway (NS), including nearly all of the former PRR. Amtrak received the electrified segment east of Harrisburg.
Brand/Importer Information:
In 1924 Stephan Schaffan, Sr. founded the Atlas Tool Company in Newark, New Jersey. In 1933 his son, Stephan Schaffan, Jr., came to work for his father at the age of sixteen. Steve Jr. built model airplanes as a hobby and frequented a local hobby shop. Being an enterprising young man, he would often ask the owner if there was anything he could do to earn some extra spending money. Tired of listening to his requests, the hobby-store owner threw some model railroad track parts his way and said, "Here, see if you can improve on this".

In those days, railroad modelers had to assemble and build everything from scratch. Steve Jr. created a "switch kit" which sold so well, that the entire family worked on them in the basement at night, while doing business as usual in the machine shop during the day.

Subsequently, Steve Jr. engineered the stapling of rail to fiber track, along with inventing the first practical rail joiner and pre-assembled turnouts and flexible track. All of these products, and more, helped to popularize model railroading and assisted in the creation of a mass-market hobby. The budding entrepreneur quickly outgrew the limitations of a basement and small garage operation. Realizing they could actually make a living selling track and related products, Steve and his father had the first factory built in Hillside, New Jersey at 413 Florence Avenue in 1947. On September 30, 1949, the Atlas Tool Company was officially incorporated as a New Jersey company.

In 1985, Steve was honored posthumously for his inventions by the Model Railroad Industry Association and was inducted into the Model Railroad Industry Hall of Fame in Baltimore, Maryland. In addition, Steve was nominated and entered into the National Model Railroad Association Pioneers of Model Railroading in 1995.

In the early 1990s, the Atlas Tool Company changed its name to Atlas Model Railroad Company, Inc.
Item created by: CMK on 2020-03-22 07:54:19. Last edited by CMK on 2020-05-09 14:49:03

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