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N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-2742(04) - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD E8 - Baltimore & Ohio - 1449

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Stock Number 0001-2742(04)
Secondary Stock Number 0001-002742(04)
Original Retail Price $47.98
Brand Con-Cor
Manufacturer Rivarossi
Body Style Con-Cor Diesel Engine E8
Prototype Vehicle Locomotive, Diesel, EMD E8 (Details)
Road or Company Name Baltimore & Ohio (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 1449
Paint Color(s) Blue, Black and Gray
Print Color(s) Gold
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Standard
DCC Readiness No
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype EMD
Model Variety E8A
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era NA Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160



Specific Item Information: Dummy Unit.
Price as of 2020. Con-Cor are offering older shells from their stock on a dummy chassis.

Model Information: This is a bit of an oddball. The first version used a Rivarossi made shell on a Rivarossi mechanism. Later versions recycled the Roco mechanism from the E7 using the Rivarossi shell. You can tell the difference based on whether the mechanism says "Italy" or "Austria" on the bottom. Atlas first released this model in 1967. The locomotives were made by Rivarossi which later released them under its own name. The model serves both the E-8 as well as the E-9 prototypes because the two locomotives are superficially identical. The original Rivarossi mechanism apparently is a bit of a dog, and that is likely why Atlas replaced it with the Austrian mechanism in their later releases. The models with a Roco mechanism, however, run pretty darn well and are not too loud despite the antique gearing. They pickup and drive on both trucks.

The original Italian mechanism models were made between 1967 and 1969 and appeared in Atlas Catalogs as late as 1973. They appear in various train sets form Atlas as well as being sold individually.

The same shell has also been used by Con-Cor with a Kato-made mechanism in the mid-1980's.

DCC Information: Neither the Roco nor the Rivarossi mechanism is DCC compatible. The Kato mechanism in the Con-Cor releases is not DCC compatible either.

Prototype History:
The E8 was a 2,250-horsepower (1,678 kW), A1A-A1A passenger-train locomotive built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division (EMD) of La Grange, Illinois. 450 cab versions, or E8As, were built from August 1949 to January 1954, 447 for the U.S. and 3 for Canada. 46 E8Bs were built from December 1949 to January 1954, all for the U.S. The 2,250 hp came from two 12 cylinder model 567B engines, each driving a generator to power the two traction motors on one truck. The E8 was the ninth model in the line of passenger diesels of similar design known as EMD E-units. Starting in September 1953 at total of 21 E8As were built which used either the 567BC or 567C engines.

Most of the premier passenger trains including the AT&SF "Super Chief," various CB&Q "Zephyrs," Great Northern's "Empire Builder," New York Central's "Twentieth Century" and Pennsylvania Railroad's "Broadway Limited" were pulled by EMD "E" unit diesel locomotives from the 1940's to the 1970's.

In profile the front of the nose of E7, E8, and E9 units is less slanted than earlier EMD units, and E7/8/9s (and their four axle cousins, the F-unit series) have been nicknamed bulldog nose units. Earlier E-unit locomotives were nicknamed slant nose units. After passenger trains were canceled on the Erie Lackawanna in 1970, the E8s were re-geared for freight and were very reliable for the EL. These units were on freight trains until the early years of Consolidated Railroad Corporation ("Conrail").

Units noted with the designation E8m were rebuilt using components from earlier EMC/EMD locomotives. Externally the units look just like E8s. The difference in horsepower produced in these E8m units is because the older generators are reused.

From Wikipedia
Read more on American-Rails.com

Road Name History:
The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (reporting marks B&O, BO) is one of the oldest railroads in the United States and the first common carrier railroad. It came into being mostly because the city of Baltimore wanted to compete with the newly constructed Erie Canal (which served New York City) and another canal being proposed by Pennsylvania, which would have connected Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. At first this railroad was located entirely in the state of Maryland with an original line from the port of Baltimore west to Sandy Hook. At this point to continue westward, it had to cross into Virginia (now West Virginia) over the Potomac River, adjacent to the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers. From there it passed through Virginia from Harpers Ferry to a point just west of the junction of Patterson Creek and the North Branch Potomac River where it crossed back into Maryland to reach Cumberland. From there it was extended to the Ohio River at Wheeling and a few years later also to Parkersburg, West Virginia.

It is now part of the CSX Transportation (CSX) network, and includes the oldest operational railroad bridge in the USA. The B&O also included the Leiper Railroad, the first permanent horse-drawn railroad in the U.S. In later years, B&O advertising carried the motto: "Linking 13 Great States with the Nation." Part of the B&O Railroad's immortality has come from being one of the four featured railroads on the U.S. version of the board game Monopoly, but it is the only railroad on the board which did not serve Atlantic City, New Jersey, directly.

When CSX established the B&O Railroad Museum as a separate entity from the corporation, some of the former B&O Mount Clare Shops in Baltimore, including the Mt. Clare roundhouse, were donated to the museum while the rest of the property was sold. The B&O Warehouse at the Camden Yards rail junction in Baltimore now dominates the view over the right-field wall at the Baltimore Orioles' current home, Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

At the end of 1970 B&O operated 5552 miles of road and 10449 miles of track, not including the Staten Island Rapid Transit (SIRT) or the Reading and its subsidiaries.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
Con-Cor has been in business since 1962. Many things have changed over time as originally they were a complete manufacturing operation in the USA and at one time had upwards of 45 employees. They not only designed the models,but they also built their own molds, did injection molding, painting, printing and packaging on their models.

Currently, most of their manufacturing has been moved overseas and now they import 90% of their products as totally finished goods, or in finished components. They only do some incidental manufacturing today within the USA.

Important Note: The Con-Cor product numbering can be very confusing. Please see here in the article how to properly enter Con-Cor stock numbers in the TroveStar database.

Item created by: CNW400 on 2020-06-29 16:20:15. Last edited by Alain LM on 2021-05-07 01:46:54

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