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N Scale - JnJ - 9305-1 - Covered Hopper, 2-Bay, ACF Centerflow - Missouri Pacific - 706005

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Stock Number 9305-1
Original Retail Price $0.00
Brand JnJ
Manufacturer Athearn
Body Style Athearn Covered Hopper 2-Bay ACF 2970
Prototype Vehicle Covered Hopper, 2-Bay, ACF Centerflow (Details)
Road or Company Name Missouri Pacific (Details)
Reporting Marks MP
Road or Reporting Number 706005
Paint Color(s) Grey
Print Color(s) Black
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Ready-to-Run No
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Covered Hopper
Model Subtype 2-Bay
Model Variety ACF 2970
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era IV: 2nd Gen Diesel (1958 - 1978)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: Features: Round or trough hatches per prototype; Photo-etched metal roof walk; Separately applied wire grab irons; Separate brake cylinder, valve and air reservoir with brake plumbing; Detailed outlets; Minimum radius: 9-3/4"

Prototype History:
The 2-bay covered hopper first entered service in the 1950s. The cars handle loads such as cement, sand and similar denser bulk commodities. In the 1960s, American Car and Foundry introduced the Centerflow design. The Centerflow relies on the car's rounded body to provide structural strength without the added weight of bracing, as well as making gravity unloading easier. This 2-bay car came in a 2,970-cubic foot capacity.

The first ACF covered hoppers were rib-side cars, like many others of the time. In the 1960's ACF eliminated the supporting ribs and started building what they called the Center Flow(R) hopper with a smooth, rounded side. The cars were built at several ACF plants, but the Huntington, West Virginia plant built only Center Flow cars since their inception and was the primary builder.

Road Name History:
The Missouri Pacific Railroad (reporting mark MP), commonly abbreviated MoPac, with nickname of The Mop, was one of the first railroads in the United States west of the Mississippi River. MoPac was a Class I railroad growing from dozens of predecessors and mergers, including the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railway (SLIMS), Texas and Pacific Railway (TP), Chicago and Eastern Illinois Railroad (C&EI), St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railway (SLBM), Kansas, Oklahoma and Gulf Railway (KO&G), Midland Valley Railroad (MV), San Antonio, Uvalde and Gulf Railroad (SAU&G), Gulf Coast Lines (GC), International-Great Northern Railroad (IGN), New Orleans, Texas and Mexico Railway (NOTM), Missouri-Illinois Railroad (MI), as well as the small Central Branch Railway (an early predecessor of MP in Kansas and south central Nebraska), and joint ventures such as the Alton and Southern Railroad (AS).

In 1967, the railroad operated 9,041 miles of road and 13,318 miles of track, not including DK&S, NO&LC, T&P and its subsidiaries, C&EI and Missouri-Illinois.

On January 8, 1980, the Union Pacific Railroad agreed to buy the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Lawsuits filed by competing railroads delayed approval of the merger until September 13, 1982. After the Supreme Court denied a trial to the Southern Pacific, the merger took effect on December 22, 1982. However, due to outstanding bonds of the Missouri Pacific, the merger with Union Pacific become official only on January 1, 1997.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
JnJ Trains was started by Jon Cloyd in 1985 to fill the need for details in the growing N scale market. Over the years JnJ has grown from supplying just a few detail parts, to offering over 500 distinctive items. Including body shells, etched and metal details, and special run cars. JnJ can also save you 20% or more on items in the Walthers N&Z catalog (excluding JnJ products).

Item created by: CNW400 on 2020-10-31 17:40:42

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