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N Scale - Loco-Motives - 1015 - Caboose, Bay Window - Southern - X515

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Stock Number 1015
Original Retail Price $8.98
Brand Loco-Motives
Manufacturer Model Power
Body Style Model Power Caboose Bay Window
Prototype Vehicle Caboose, Bay Window (Details)
Road or Company Name Southern (Details)
Road or Reporting Number X515
Paint Color(s) Red with Black Roof
Print Color(s) White
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Ready-to-Run No
Kit Complexity Easy-Build
Release Date 1991-01-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Caboose
Model Subtype Bay Window
Model Variety Window Sides
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era NA Era II: Late Steam (1901 - 1938)
Scale 1/160
Track Gauge N standard



Model Information: This Model Power body style was released in the 1990s and is a Chinese knock-off of Lima's Bay Window model from the 1960s and 1970s. The only noticeable difference is that the window bays are part of the body mold, whereas with the Lima body, they were separately attached.

Prototype History:
In a bay window caboose, the crew monitoring the train sits in the middle of the car in a section of wall that projects from the side of the caboose. The windows set into these extended walls resemble architectural bay windows, so the caboose type is called a bay window caboose. This type afforded a better view of the side of the train and eliminated the falling hazard of the cupola. The bay window gained favor with many railroads because it eliminated the need for additional clearances in tunnels and overpasses. On the west coast, the Milwaukee Road and the Northern Pacifc Railway used these cars, converting over 900 roof top cabooses to bay window cabooses in the late 1930's. Milwaukee Road rib-side window cabooses are preserved at New Libson, Wisconsin, the Illinois Railway Museum, the Mt. Rainer Scenic Railroad, and Cedarburg, Wisconsin.

When the shift was made from wooden to steel caboose construction, a new type of caboose also arrived. The new caboose design replaced the traditional roof-mounted “cupola” with “bay-windows” attached to the sides of the caboose. As freight cars grew taller, the effectiveness of cupolas as practical observation points was diminished. This was especially true on lines that suffered from low clearances and were incapable of making cupolas high enough to see over the top of the tallest freight cars. Cabooses were prone to rough handling, and many a trainman was knocked out of his perch in the cupola and injured when he fell. The new caboose design was safer as well as more effective.

Road Name History:
The Southern Railway (reporting mark SOU) (also known as Southern Railway Company) was a US class 1 railroad that was based in the Southern United States. It was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined beginning in the 1830s, formally becoming the Southern Railway in 1894.

At the end of 1970 Southern operated 6,026 miles (9,698 km) of railroad, not including its Class I subsidiaries AGS (528 miles or 850 km) CofG (1729 miles) S&A (167 miles) CNOTP (415 miles) GS&F (454 miles) and twelve Class II subsidiaries. That year Southern itself reported 26111 million net ton-miles of revenue freight and 110 million passenger-miles; AGS reported 3854 and 11, CofG 3595 and 17, S&A 140 and 0, CNO&TP 4906 and 0.3, and GS&F 1431 and 0.3

The railroad joined forces with the Norfolk and Western Railway (N&W) in 1982 to form the Norfolk Southern Corporation. The Norfolk Southern Corporation was created in response to the creation of the CSX Corporation (its rail system was later transformed to CSX Transportation in 1986). The Southern Railway was renamed Norfolk Southern Railway in 1990 and continued under that name ever since. Seven years later in 1997 the railroad absorbed the Norfolk and Western Railway, ending the Norfolk and Western's existence as an independent railroad.

Brand/Importer Information: Loco-Motives was a division of Mallerich Hobby Corp. The company provided custom printing services for railroad modeling. Mallerich Hobby Corporation was incorporated on Friday 31st January 1992 in Taneytown Maryland. They are no longer in business. They repainted other companies models.

Item created by: CNW400 on 2021-06-23 19:22:16. Last edited by Alain LM on 2021-12-09 04:15:02

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