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N Scale - E-R Models - 70106 - Caboose, Bay Window - Chicago & North Western - 11193

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Stock Number 70106
Original Retail Price $12.95
Brand E-R Models
Manufacturer Rivarossi
Body Style Rivarossi Caboose Bay Window
Prototype Vehicle Caboose, Bay Window (Details)
Road or Company Name Chicago & North Western (Details)
Reporting Marks CNW
Road or Reporting Number 11193
Paint Color(s) Yellow and Green
Print Color(s) Green
Additional Markings/Slogan We commit to Safety First!
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Body-Mount
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Deep Flange
Release Date 1995-08-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Caboose
Model Subtype Bay Window
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era NA Era II: Late Steam (1901 - 1938)
Scale 1/160
Track Gauge N standard



Model Information: This model of caboose was made for Atlas by Rivarossi and made its debut in the 1969 Atlas catalog. Unlike the "End Cupola" caboose, this model was never retooled for Chinese production and only 7 different versions were ever made by Atlas. Rivarossi continued to sell it under its own brand from 1977, retaining 4 of the Atlas road names and adding a new one. Moreover, in the mid-1990s, E-R Models did contract Rivarossi to re-introduce the model under the E-R name and 20 more versions were later produced. It is similar to Bay-Window cabooses made by Walthers, Micro-Trains and others. It can be distinguished from the other manufacturer's versions in that it has three windows in each body side, and 4 windows on each bay.

Prototype History:
In a bay window caboose, the crew monitoring the train sits in the middle of the car in a section of wall that projects from the side of the caboose. The windows set into these extended walls resemble architectural bay windows, so the caboose type is called a bay window caboose. This type afforded a better view of the side of the train and eliminated the falling hazard of the cupola. The bay window gained favor with many railroads because it eliminated the need for additional clearances in tunnels and overpasses. On the west coast, the Milwaukee Road and the Northern Pacifc Railway used these cars, converting over 900 roof top cabooses to bay window cabooses in the late 1930's. Milwaukee Road rib-side window cabooses are preserved at New Libson, Wisconsin, the Illinois Railway Museum, the Mt. Rainer Scenic Railroad, and Cedarburg, Wisconsin.

When the shift was made from wooden to steel caboose construction, a new type of caboose also arrived. The new caboose design replaced the traditional roof-mounted “cupola” with “bay-windows” attached to the sides of the caboose. As freight cars grew taller, the effectiveness of cupolas as practical observation points was diminished. This was especially true on lines that suffered from low clearances and were incapable of making cupolas high enough to see over the top of the tallest freight cars. Cabooses were prone to rough handling, and many a trainman was knocked out of his perch in the cupola and injured when he fell. The new caboose design was safer as well as more effective.

Road Name History:
The Chicago and North Western Transportation Company (reporting mark CNW) was a Class I railroad in the Midwestern United States. It was also known as the North Western. The railroad operated more than 5,000 miles (8,000 km) of track as of the turn of the 20th century, and over 12,000 miles (19,000 km) of track in seven states before retrenchment in the late 1970s.

Until 1972, when the company was sold to its employees, it was named the Chicago and North Western Railway. The C&NW became one of the longest railroads in the United States as a result of mergers with other railroads, such as the Chicago Great Western Railway, Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway and others.

By 1995, track sales and abandonment had reduced the total mileage back to about 5,000. The majority of the abandoned and sold lines were lightly trafficked branches in Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Large line sales, such as those that resulted in the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad further helped reduce the railroad to a mainline core with several regional feeders and branches.

The company was purchased by Union Pacific Railroad (UP) in April 1995 and ceased to exist.

Brand/Importer Information:
E-R (Euro-Rail) Models was based at 1000 South Main Street in Newark, New York. The owner's name is Al Muniz. They produced reprints of various models using toolings discarded by Atlas (and possibly other manufacturers). They also produced their own locomotive, the Baldwin RF-16 Sharknose. The model was manufactured by Bachmann in China. E-R filed for bankruptcy in 2001.

Item created by: Alain LM on 2022-01-16 16:12:36. Last edited by Alain LM on 2022-01-16 16:13:03

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