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N Scale - Micro-Trains - 20242 - Boxcar, 40 Foot, PS-1 - New York Central - 6-Pack

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N Scale - Micro-Trains - 20242 - Boxcar, 40 Foot, PS-1 - New York Central - 6-Pack Copyright held by TroveStar


N Scale - Micro-Trains - 20242 - Boxcar, 40 Foot, PS-1 - New York Central - 6-Pack Copyright Held by TroveStar


Stock Number 20242
Secondary Stock Number 020 00 242
Original Retail Price $47.40
Brand Micro-Trains
Manufacturer Kadee Quality Products
Body Style Micro-Trains Boxcar 40 Foot PS-1
Prototype Vehicle Boxcar, 40 Foot, PS-1 (Details)
Road or Company Name New York Central (Details)
Reporting Marks NYC
Road or Reporting Number 6-Pack
Paint Color(s) Red and Gray, w. Red door
Print Color(s) White
Paint Scheme Pacemaker
Additional Markings/Slogan Pacemaker Freight Service
Coupler Type MT Magne-Matic Knuckle
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Plastic Wheels With Steel Axle
Wheel Profile Standard
Multipack Yes
Multipack Count 6
Multipack ID Number 20242-6
Release Date 1981-01-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Boxcar
Model Subtype 40 Foot
Model Variety Steel, PS-1
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160
Track Gauge N standard



Specific Item Information: Road Numbers: 174479, 174482, 174483, 174493, 174504, 174511

Model Information: This is Micro-Trains first body style. It was introduced in 1972. Its is a model of a Pullman-Standard PS-1 boxcar from circa 1957. Micro-Trains does not market it as a PS-1 so as to allow themselves some latitude so they can use this car to model non-PS prototypes. Hundreds of different releases have used this body style in various paint schemes and road names. They are equipped with 6' sliding doors, either Youngstown (4/5/4 rib pattern) or Superior (7 panels). It is not a model of a "modern" steel boxcar as the length (40 foot) and the roofwalk are more typical of the transition era (1939 - 1957).

In 2019, Micro-Trains started releasing this model with new body-mounted couplers attached to a new underframe.

Prototype History:
The 40' Boxcar is widely known as one of the most popular freight cars used by railroads as they transitioned from steam to diesel. In particular the Pullman Standard or PS-1 design was one of the most popular and was widely used by North American railroads. These boxcars were built beginning in 1947 and share the same basic design, with certain elements such as door size, door style or roof type varying among the different railroads and production years. When production of these cars ceased in 1963, over 100,000 had been produced.

So just what is a PS-1? Well the simple answer is it is any boxcar built by Pullman Standard from 1947 on. The design changed over the years – sometimes subtly, sometimes for customer request, and sometimes in a larger way. In general, most PS-1’s built from 1947 to 1961 share the same dimensions and basic construction techniques. These cars all had a length of 40′, a height of 10’5″ or 10’6″, welded sides and ends and roof of Pullman’s own design. The greatest variation was in the size and style of doors used. Pullman Standard also offered 50′ and later 60′ boxcars – also with the PS-1 designation.

Road Name History:
The New York Central Railroad (reporting mark NYC), known simply as the New York Central in its publicity, was a railroad operating in the Northeastern United States. Headquartered in New York City, the railroad served most of the Northeast, including extensive trackage in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, and Massachusetts, plus additional trackage in the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec.

The railroad primarily connected greater New York and Boston in the east with Chicago and St.Louis in the midwest along with the intermediate cities of Albany, Buffalo, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Detroit. NYC's Grand Central Terminal in New York City is one of its best known extant landmarks.

1853 company formation: Albany industrialist and Mohawk Valley Railroad owner Erastus Corning managed to unite ten railroads together into one system, and on March 17, 1853 executives and stockholders of each company agreed to merge. The merger was approved by the state legislature on April 2, and by May 17, 1853 the New York Central Railroad was formed.

In 1867 Vanderbilt acquired control of the Albany to Buffalo running NYC. On November 1, 1869 he merged the NYC with his Hudson River Railroad into the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad. Vanderbilt's other lines were operated as part of the NYC.

In 1914, the operations of eleven subsidiaries were merged with the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad, re-forming the New York Central Railroad. From the beginning of the merge, the railroad was publicly referred to as the New York Central Lines. In the summer of 1935, the identification was changed to the New York Central System.

In 1968 the NYC merged with its former rival, the Pennsylvania Railroad, to form Penn Central (the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad joined in 1969). That company went bankrupt in 1970 and was taken over by the federal government and merged into Conrail in 1976. Conrail was broken up in 1998, and portions of its system was transferred to the newly formed New York Central Lines LLC, a subsidiary leased to and eventually absorbed by CSX and Norfolk Southern. Those companies' lines included the original New York Central main line, but outside that area it included lines that were never part of the New York Central system. CSX was able to take one of the most important main lines in the nation, which runs from New York City and Boston to Cleveland, Ohio, as part of the Water Level Route, while Norfolk Southern gained the Cleveland, Ohio to Chicago, Illinois portion of the line called the Chicago line.

At the end of 1925, the New York Central System operated 11,584 miles (18,643 km) of road and 26,395 miles (42,479 km) of track; at the end of 1967 the mileages were 9,696 miles (15,604 km) and 18,454 miles (29,699 km).

Read more on Wikipedia.

Paint Scheme:
Pacemaker cars painted starting in 1946 for service as cars were modified from regular boxcar service to high speed lightweight service. It took until 1953 before all 1000 lot 737-B cars were modified and painted for Pacemaker service. Paint was Sherwin-Williams flash-dri paint red over gray. Red door and side sill under door when door in closed position also red. Ladders, grab iron rungs, brake wheel, underframe and trucks were black. As originally painted - Gothic lettering and herald white - no black background to herald. Paint diagram shows roof as black F-1 car cement, though most cars had red overspray making the roof appear red from ground level. No dimensional data on cars when originally painted other than LD LMT and LT WT. After February 1951 - cars that were repainted had reporting marks, car number as well as LD LMT and LT WT data painted black. Three cars - #174146, #174654 and #174861 - had ALL lettering in black - including the PACEMAKER FREIGHT SERVICE logo - circa 1952. Lot 848-B cars delivered in Pacemaker paint including complete dimensional data in black - these were the only cars built new in the PACEMAKER scheme - delivered in 1954. In September/October 1955, the oval "System" herald had the black background return. Complete dimensional data added to cars that were not fully repainted - usually in white paint. Also, there were 200 temporary Pacemaker Service cars from lot 773-B - which DID NOT receive the full red/gray Pacemaker paint. Most did receive the PACEMAKER FREIGHT SERVICE logo over their regular paint job, while some cars only received a small rectangle with the word PACEMAKER inside ( starting around April 1950 ).. When cars removed from Pacemaker service (starting in late 1959) - cars either repainted in regular boxcar scheme of the day or simply had the '4' in the car number changed to '5'.

Brand/Importer Information: Micro-Trains is the brand name used by both Kadee Quality Products and Micro-Trains Line. For a history of the relationship between the brand and the two companies, please consult our Micro-Trains Collector's Guide.

Manufacturer Information:
Kadee Quality Products originally got involved in N-Scale by producing a scaled-down version of their successful HO Magne-Matic knuckle coupler system. This coupler was superior to the ubiquitous 'Rapido' style coupler due to two primary factors: superior realistic appearance and the ability to automatically uncouple when stopped over a magnet embedded in a section of track. The success of these couplers in N-Scale quickly translated to the production of trucks, wheels and in 1972 a release of ready-to-run box cars.
In October 1990 Kadee separated in two companies, with the newly created Micro-Trains® Line Co. continuing the Z, Nn3, and N Scale product ranges, with Kadee retaining the HO range.

Item created by: Lethe on 2015-05-31 17:46:30. Last edited by Lethe on 2020-05-08 00:00:00

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