Search:
Type the text to search here and press Enter.
Separate search terms by a space; they will all be searched individually in all fields of the database.

Click on Search: to go to the advanced search page.

N Scale - Hallmark Models - NS0166 - Locomotive, Diesel, Alco DL-109 - New Haven

Please help support TroveStar. Why?

N Scale - Hallmark Models - NS0166 - Locomotive, Diesel, Alco DL-109 - New Haven Images courtesy of Brasstrains.com


N Scale - Hallmark Models - NS0166 - Locomotive, Diesel, Alco DL-109 - New Haven


Brand Hallmark Models
Stock Number NS0166
Secondary Stock Number BG-SKU: 34826
Original Retail Price $150.00
Manufacturer Samhongsa
Production Type Regular Production
Body Style Hallmark Diesel Engine DL-109
Prototype Locomotive, Diesel, Alco DL-109 (Details)
Road or Company Name New Haven (Details)
Reporting Marks NH
Paint Color(s) Green and Dulux Gold
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Standard
Kit Material(s) Brass and Injection Molded Plastic
DCC Readiness No
Release Date 1983-01-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype Alco
Model Variety DL-109
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: This brass model was introduced by Hallmark in 1984. Like most brass locomotive models, this engine lacks window-glazing, lighting, and couplers. It does, fortunately, have pockets for easy installation of MTL couplers, and they even provide the screws to help you attach them. The shell detail is excellent. The paint is sharp and there are tons of detail parts such as hand-grabs. They also have detailed interiors. This is a fairly rare feature for ANY N Scale model. All wheels are geared. Ten of the twelve wheels provide pickup The loco is driven by a 5-pole, skew-wound motor.

DCC Information: No provision for DCC

Prototype History:
The ALCO DL-109 is one of six models of A1A-A1A Diesel locomotives built to haul passenger trains by the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) between December, 1939 and April, 1945 ("DL" stands for Diesel Locomotive). They were of a cab unit design, and both cab-equipped lead A units DL-103b, DL-105, DL-107, DL-109 and cabless booster B units DL-108, DL-110 models were built. The units were styled by noted industrial designer Otto Kuhler, who incorporated into his characteristic cab (US Patent D121,219) the trademark three-piece windshield design. A total of 74 cab units and four cabless booster units were built.

Alco's DL-109 marks their early entry into the passenger diesel market in 1940. With its sleek lines, knife-edged nose and long wheelbase, it was ideally suited for high-speed service, and with 2,000 horsepower under the hood, it could handle passengers or high-speed freight with ease. Because of its dual-service capabilities, Alco was allowed to construct the DL-109 in the face of wartime restrictions on passenger-only locos, and the units performed admirably round the clock, handling passengers during the day and freight trains at night. Using lessons learned with the DL-109, it was succeeded by the PA-1 in 1946. Full data sheet on The Diesel Workshop.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Road Name History:
The New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad (reporting mark NH), commonly known as the New Haven, was a railroad that operated in New England from 1872 to 1968, dominating the region's rail traffic for the first half of the 20th century.

Beginning in the 1890s and accelerating in 1903, New York banker J. P. Morgan sought to monopolize New England transportation by arranging the NH's acquisition of 50 companies, including other railroads and steamship lines, and building a network of electrified trolley lines that provided interurban transportation for all of southern New England. By 1912, the New Haven operated more than 2,000 miles (3,200 km) of track, with 120,000 employees, and practically monopolized traffic in a wide swath from Boston to New York City.

This quest for monopoly angered Progressive Era reformers, alienated public opinion, resulted in high prices for acquisitions, and increased construction costs. Debt soared from $14 million in 1903 to $242 million in 1913, even as the advent of automobiles, trucks and buses reduced railroad profits. Also in 1913, the federal government filed an anti-trust lawsuit that forced the NH to divest its trolley systems.

The line became bankrupt in 1935, was reorganized and reduced in scope, went bankrupt again in 1961, and in 1969 was merged with the Penn Central system, formed a year earlier by the merger of the also bankrupt New York Central Railroad and Pennsylvania Railroad; Already a poorly conceived merger, Penn Central proceeded to go bankrupt in 1970, becoming the largest bankruptcy in the U.S. until the Enron Corporation superseded it in 2001. The remnants of the system now comprise Metro-North Railroad's New Haven Line, (parts of) Amtrak's Northeast Corridor, Shore Line East, parts of the MBTA, and numerous freight operators such as CSX and the Providence and Worcester Railroad. The majority of the system is now owned publicly by the states of Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts.

Read more on Wikipedia and New Haven Railroad Historical and Technical Association, Inc.

Brand/Importer Information:
Hallmark Models was the importing arm of Bobbye Hall's Hobby Shop of Dallas, Texas. When Bobbye Hall retired in her nineties, both the importing business and the shop closed down.

Manufacturer Information: Samhongsa was a Korean manufacturer of model trains, well know for its brass models, imported notably by Hallmark Models. The company ceased its activity in the early 2000s. Some of the employees continued the brass model business as Sam Model Tech..

Item created by: Alain LM on 2016-08-10 03:46:42. Last edited by Alain LM on 2020-08-11 04:41:21

If you see errors or missing data in this entry, please feel free to log in and edit it. Anyone with a Gmail account can log in instantly.