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N Scale - Life-Like - 7436 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD GP60 - Rio Grande - 3154

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6  of these sold for an average price of: 59.9259.926 of these sold for an average price of: 59.92
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Collectors value this item at an average of 61.9061.90Collectors value this item at an average of 61.90
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N Scale - Life-Like - 7436 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD GP60 - Rio Grande - 3154
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Stock Number 7436
Original Retail Price $95.00
Brand Life-Like
Manufacturer Life-Like
Body Style Life-Like Diesel Engine GP60
Prototype Vehicle Locomotive, Diesel, EMD GP60 (Details)
Road or Company Name Rio Grande (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 3154
Paint Color(s) Black
Print Color(s) Orange
Coupler Type AccuMate Magnetic Knuckle
Wheel Type Chemically Blackened Metal
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
DCC Readiness No
Release Date 2005-01-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype EMD
Model Variety GP60
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era NA Era V: Modern Diesel (1979 - Present)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: Life-Like introduced this model in 2004. The original version had no DCC capability. A new mechanism was swapped in in 2012 with appropriate DCC readiness. The detailing is quite nice and the performance is excellent in terms of quietness, smoothness, low-speed operation and pulling.

DCC Information: Anything designed for Life-Like's DCC-Ready GP20 will work (IE a Digitrax DN163L0A or a TCS L1D4).

Prototype History:
An EMD GP60 is a 4-axle (B-B) diesel-electric locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division between 1985 and 1994. The GP60 was EMD's first engine that was classified as a "third-generation" locomotive. Hidden behind the electrical cabinet doors on the rear wall of the cab, the GP60 concealed a trio of microprocessors that monitored and managed a host of engine, cooling system and control functions. The engine's on-board microprocessors replaced hundreds of wiring circuits, dozens of relays and all but one module card, making it an improvement among EMD's engines.

Power was provided by a 16-cylinder 710G3A diesel engine, which could produce 3,800 horsepower (2,800 kW). This locomotive was 59 feet 9 inches long and featured a 3,700-US-gallon (14,000 L) fuel tank. The GP60 series shared the same frame as the GP59. Cabless 'B' units of this locomotive model were also built; they were known as GP60B models, purchased exclusively by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. Units built with a wide/comfort/safety cab and a wide nose were designated GP60M and all purchased by the Santa Fe. A total of 294 GP60, 23 GP60B and 63 GP60M units were built by EMD. Due to the mainstream focus of railroads on powerful six-axle units, and strict emissions standards, the GP60 will most likely be the last new EMD "Geep".

From Wikipedia

Road Name History:
The Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad (reporting mark DRGW), often shortened to Rio Grande, D&RG or D&RGW, formerly the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad, was an American Class I railroad company. The railroad started as a 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge line running south from Denver, Colorado in 1870. It served mainly as a transcontinental bridge line between Denver, and Salt Lake City, Utah.

In 1988, the Rio Grande's parent corporation, Rio Grande Industries, purchased Southern Pacific Transportation Company, and as the result of a merger, the larger Southern Pacific Railroad name was chosen for identity. The Rio Grande operated as a separate division of the Southern Pacific, until that company was acquired by the Union Pacific Railroad. Today, most former D&RGW main lines are owned and operated by the Union Pacific while several branch lines are now operated as heritage railways by various companies.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
Life-Like Products LLC (now Life-Like Toy and Hobby division of Wm. K. Walthers) was a manufacturer of model railroad products and was based in Baltimore, Maryland.

It was founded in the 1950s by a company that pioneered extruded foam ice chests under the Lifoam trademark. Because ice chests are a summer seasonal item, the company needed a way to keep the factory operating year round. As model railroading was becoming popular in the post-war years, they saw this as an opportunity and so manufactured extruded foam tunnels for model trains. Over the years, Life-Like expanded into other scenery items, finally manufacturing rolling stock beginning in the late 1960s. At some point in the early 1970s, Life-Like purchased Varney Inc. and began to produce the former Varney line as its own.

The Canadian distributor for Life-Like products, Canadian Hobbycraft, saw a missing segment in market for Canadian model prototypes, and started producing a few Canadian models that were later, with a few modifications, offered in the US market with US roadnames.

In 2005, the company, now known as Lifoam Industries, LLC, decided to concentrate on their core products of extruded foam and sold their model railroad operations to Wm. K. Walthers.

In June 2018, Atlas and Walthers announced to have reached an agreement under which all Walthers N scale rolling stock tooling, including the former Life-Like tooling, will be purchased by Atlas.

Read more on Wikipedia and The Train Collectors Association.

Item created by: gdm on 2017-01-11 07:34:03

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