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N Scale - Arnold - 056 SF - Passenger Train, Diesel, North American, Transition Era - Santa Fe - 5-Unit

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Stock Number 056 SF
Secondary Stock Number 056
Original Retail Price $34.98
Brand Arnold
Manufacturer Arnold
Body Style Arnold Rapido Train Set North America
Prototype Vehicle Passenger Train, Diesel, North American, Transition Era (Details)
Road or Company Name Santa Fe (Details)
Reporting Marks Super Chief
Road or Reporting Number 5-Unit
Paint Color(s) Red, Silver, Yellow, Black
Print Color(s) Black, Yellow
Paint Scheme Warbonnet
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Deep Flange
Multipack Yes
Multipack Count 5
Multipack ID Number 056 SF
DCC Readiness No
Release Date 1964-01-01
Item Category Starter Sets
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype EMD
Model Variety F9 5-Unit Set
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era NA Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160



Specific Item Information: Consists of twin diesel F9's (one is a dummy), and 3 passenger cars.
- 0264 SF locomotive F9 powered
- 0265 SF locomotive F9 dummy
- 0351 SF Streamlined Coach
- 0353 SF Streamlined Dome
- 0355 SF Streamlined Observation

Prototype History:
The transition era (1939 - 1957) was the heyday for passenger rail. The industrial boom triggered by the second world war created tremendous capacity for production which was no longer needed for war production. The North American factories turned to consumer goods and services and the rail system was a major recipient of this ouput.

The interstate highways system as we know it now was still a thing of the future and long distance travel by highway was simply not practical and aircraft travel was still a luxury for the well-to-do. People traveled the country by rail and there was a huge variety of railroads and services available to the traveler. Innovation was constant, and the materials and machinery employed by the railroads was evolving as fast as the engineers could think of new things to entice the fickle consumer to ride a particular route or particular service.

This all came to an end when the automobile and airplane replaced the passenger train as the preferred vehicles of transportation in the 1960s.

Road Name History:
The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (reporting mark ATSF), often abbreviated as Santa Fe or AT&SF, was one of the larger railroads in the United States. Chartered in February 1859, the railroad reached the Kansas-Colorado border in 1873 and Pueblo, Colorado, in 1876. To create a demand for its services, the railroad set up real estate offices and sold farm land from the land grants that it was awarded by Congress. Despite the name, its main line never served Santa Fe, New Mexico, as the terrain was too difficult; the town ultimately was reached by a branch line from Lamy.

The Santa Fe was a pioneer in intermodal freight transport, an enterprise that (at one time or another) included a tugboat fleet and an airline (the short-lived Santa Fe Skyway). Its bus line extended passenger transportation to areas not accessible by rail, and ferryboats on the San Francisco Bay allowed travelers to complete their westward journeys to the Pacific Ocean. The ATSF was the subject of a popular song, Harry Warren & Johnny Mercer's "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe", written for the film, The Harvey Girls (1946).

The railroad officially ceased operations on December 31, 1996, when it merged with the Burlington Northern Railroad to form the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Railway.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Paint Scheme:
While there were many, now-classic paint schemes to grace locomotives during the start of the diesel and streamliner age of the 1930s none became as legendary as Santa Fe's "Warbonnet" (and most did not even receive a formal name). The design was the creation of artist Leland A. Knickerbocker, who worked for General Motors. During the mid-1930s the company needed a classy, matching livery to the Native-American themed train that the Santa Fe was planning to debut. Of course, you probably know the name of this train, the Super Chief, which went on to become just as famous as the paint it wore.

The Warbonnet was shelved by the railroad following the end of passenger service in 1971 but was readopted in the late 1980s. Following the creation of Burlington Northern Santa Fe in 1995 a version of the livery was briefly used but was finally dropped altogether.

From AmericaRails.com

Brand/Importer Information:
Founded in 1906 by Karl Arnold in Nuernberg, K. Arnold & Co. began its life producing tin toys and related items. They produced an extensive line of model ships, doll house items and other toys. In 1935, K. Arnold & Co. hired Max Ernst as their managing director. Ernst, not to be confused with the German realist artist of the same name, was a significant factor in the future of Arnold.

There are several distinct phases of Arnold's model train production. In the period of 1960 - 1962, Arnold marketed the Arnold Rapido 200 product line; this line was very crude yet it also was a sensation because of its much smaller size than TT.

The next phase was from 1963-1967, when the rapido product line begins to swing toward scale representations of the trains. It is during this period that the "Rapido Coupler" comes into production, beginning its widespread use by all model train manufacturers in N-Scale. It was in 1964 that the term "N-Scale" came into use. Between 1968 and 1970, rapido line of trains reached maturity, notably with its turntable and roundhouse. Arnold entered into a business relationship with the U.S. company Revell around 1968, beginning the marketing of Revell Rapido model trains. This relationship was marked by the beginning of production of more accurate North American prototype models by Arnold. This relationship continued for several years, ending in the late 1960s or early 1970s. Arnold continued their expanded production, with new models until the early 1990s.

On Max Ernst's 1976 retirement, Arnold employed perhaps 200 to 250 people, using three facilities in the Nurnberg area. The Company continued under family control until 1995, when Arnold went into bankruptcy and was sold to Rivarossi of Italy. Rivarossi, in turn, also went bankrupt, leading to the sale of all assets to Hornby of the United Kingdom. Production is carried out in China.

Item created by: klausnahr on 2020-08-08 09:28:24. Last edited by Alain LM on 2020-08-09 05:08:04

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