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N Scale - JC Timmer - 4012 - Open Hopper, 4-Bay Steel - Canadian Pacific - 35644

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N Scale - JC Timmer - 4012 - Open Hopper, 4-Bay Steel - Canadian Pacific - 35644


Brand JC Timmer
Stock Number 4012
Manufacturer Roco
Production Type Regular Production
Body Style Roco Open Hopper 4-Bay Rib Side
Prototype Open Hopper, 4-Bay Steel (Details)
Road or Company Name Canadian Pacific (Details)
Reporting Marks CP
Road or Reporting Number 35644
Paint Color(s) Red
Print Color(s) White and Black
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Body Material Plastic
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Open Hopper
Model Subtype 4-Bay
Model Variety Rib Side
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era IV: 2nd Gen Diesel (1958 - 1978)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: Roco made 2 different 4-bay open hopper N Scale models in the late 1960s/early 1970s. This one is the rib-side version and the other one is an offset side. At first glance, it is fairly easy to confuse the two. The rib-side versions were made for AHM specifically and were stamped 'AHM Austria' on the bottom. They were later imported for a brief time by another company called JC Timmer in CP paint schemes. Walthers also imported these with Roco branded boxes. I have to assume that the stamping on the JC Timmer and Roco versions do NOT say 'AHM Austria' on the bottom.

Overall it is a pretty nice tooling for its time. The molded details are quite fine and even include rivet patterns on the interior. I have seen 3rd generation models with less detail inside the cargo area. The AHM versions have blackened metal wheels whereas the JC Timmer and Roco versions have nickel-silver plated wheels. The couplers are truck mounted (no surprise given the age of this tooling).

Prototype History:
The 1960s brought about a growth in car size (and capacity). Railroads that transported coal moved away from the older 2-bay 55-ton USRA standard to newer 90- and 100-ton three bay hoppers. These cars were effective and long-lived. Many railroads swapped out the trucks on these cars to increase the capacity to 100 tons. Many companies produced these, including Pullman, Bethlehem, Evans, Greenville, Trinity and Ortner. The offset side variant of these hoppers carried a little more capacity than their rib-sided cousins.

Road Name History:
The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), formerly also known as CP Rail (reporting mark CP) between 1968 and 1996, is a historic Canadian Class I railroad incorporated in 1881. The railroad is owned by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited (TSX: CP, NYSE: CP), which began operations as legal owner in a corporate restructuring in 2001.

Headquartered in Calgary, Alberta, it owns approximately 23,000 kilometres (14,000 mi) of track all across Canada and into the United States, stretching from Montreal to Vancouver, and as far north as Edmonton. Its rail network also serves major cities in the United States, such as Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Detroit, Chicago, and New York City.

The railway was originally built between Eastern Canada and British Columbia between 1881 and 1885 (connecting with Ottawa Valley and Georgian Bay area lines built earlier), fulfilling a promise extended to British Columbia when it entered Confederation in 1871. It was Canada's first transcontinental railway, but currently does not reach the Atlantic coast. Primarily a freight railway, the CPR was for decades the only practical means of long-distance passenger transport in most regions of Canada, and was instrumental in the settlement and development of Western Canada. The CP became one of the largest and most powerful companies in Canada, a position it held as late as 1975. Its primary passenger services were eliminated in 1986, after being assumed by Via Rail Canada in 1978. A beaver was chosen as the railway's logo because it is the national symbol of Canada and was seen as representing the hardworking character of the company.

The company acquired two American lines in 2009: the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad and the Iowa, Chicago and Eastern Railroad. The trackage of the ICE was at one time part of CP subsidiary Soo Line and predecessor line The Milwaukee Road. The combined DME/ICE system spanned North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Nebraska and Iowa, as well as two short stretches into two other states, which included a line to Kansas City, Missouri, and a line to Chicago, Illinois, and regulatory approval to build a line into the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. It is publicly traded on both the Toronto Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker CP. Its U.S. headquarters are in Minneapolis.

After close of markets on November 17, 2015, CP announced an offer to purchase all outstanding shares of Norfolk Southern Railway, at a price in excess of the US$26 billion capitalization of the United States-based railway. If completed, this merger of the second and fourth oldest Class I railroads in North America would have formed the largest single railway company on that continent, reaching from the Pacific coast to the Atlantic coast to the Gulf Coast. The merger effort was abandoned by Canadian Pacific on April 11, 2016, after three offers were rejected by the Norfolk Southern board.

Read more on Wikipedia and on Canadian Pacific official website.

Brand/Importer Information: In 1978, JC Timmer, LTD of Canada contracted with Minitrix and Roco of Germany ti build some Canadian Pacific cars especially for them. 7 cars were made: a Double Door Boxcar in silver, a Double Door Boxcar in red, a Quad Hopper in black, a Quad Hopper in red, a Tank Car in black, a Tank Car in red and a caboose in yellow. JC Timmer was based in Vancouver Canada. Although the contract was made with Trix of Germany, the actual cars were manufactured (as was much of the Minitrix line) in Austria by Roco.

Manufacturer Information:
The company was founded in 1960 by Ing. Heinz Rössler and started with a plastic Minitanks series of military vehicles. After export to the USA became successful, the model line was expanded with model trains in HO scale and the smaller N scale. TT scale was also subsequently added to the product line. The model rail product line covers many European countries including Germany, Belgium, Luxembourg, France, Spain, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, Sweden and the Netherlands, and also the USA.

On July 15, 2005 ROCO Modellspielwaren GmbH was declared bankrupt. From July 25 the company continues as Modelleisenbahn GmbH, but still uses the Roco brand and associated logo. On October 1, 2007, distribution of the 'Minitank' product series was assigned to the German model car manufacturer Herpa.

Since February 2008 Modelleisenbahn also owns Fleischmann, which like Roco had gone bankrupt. The two companies continue as separate brands under Modelleisenbahn GmbH, while benefiting from economies of scale through joined development projects, marketing and procurement.

From Wikipedia

Item created by: RoadRailer on 2017-01-24 13:36:20. Last edited by gdm on 2020-06-03 13:07:15

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