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N Scale - Lima - 361 - Passenger Car, British Rail, Mark 1 Coach - Great Western - 5015

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N Scale - Lima - 361 - Passenger Car, British Rail, Mark 1 Coach - Great Western - 5015
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Stock Number361
Secondary Stock Number320361
BrandLima
ManufacturerLima
Body StyleLima Passenger BR Mk1 CK
Prototype VehiclePassenger Car, British Rail, Mark 1 Coach (Details)
Road or Company NameGreat Western (Details)
Road or Reporting Number5015
Paint Color(s)Chocolate and Cream
Print Color(s)Yellow
Paint SchemeGWR Chocolate & Cream
Coupler TypeRapido Hook
Coupler MountTruck-Mount
Wheel TypeNickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel ProfileDeep Flange
Announcement Date1974-01-01
Release Date1976-01-01
Item CategoryPassenger Cars
Model TypeBritish
Model SubtypeMark 1 coach
Model VarietyComposite Corridor (CK)
Prototype RegionEurope
Prototype EraUK Era 4: BR Early crest (1948-1956)
Years Produced1951-1963
Scale1/160



Specific Item Information: This model is in a fictitious livery. Mark 1 coaches were only brought into service after nationalisation in 1948, when the GWR had ceased to exist - It became British Railways Western Region - and so would never have been made!
Model Information: This Mk1 Composite Corridor (CK) coach was introduced in 1967 by Lima in blue/gray BR livery. It was later released in several other liveries, up until the mid-1980's when Lima stopped offering N gauge models for the UK market.
Three other types of Mk1 coaches were introduced as well: BSK (Brake Standard Corridor), RMB (Restaurant Miniature Buffet) and BG (Brake Gangwayed, baggage).
They were distributed in the UK by Wrenn Micromodel, but also available under the Lima brand; so they can be found in either on or the other packaging.
These coaches are reputed as being under-sized in a visible manner; therefore we consider them as of 1:160 scale, and not as of 1:148 British N gauge.
Prototype History:
British Railways Mark 1 was the family designation for the first standardised designs of railway carriages built by British Railways. Following nationalisation in 1948, BR had continued to build carriages to the designs of the "Big Four" companies (the Great Western, Southern, London Midland and Scottish and London and North Eastern railways), and the Mark 1 was intended to be the standard carriage design for use across all lines, incorporating the best features of each of the former companies' designs. It was also designed to be much stronger than previous designs, to provide better protection for passengers in the event of a collision or derailment.
The Mk 1 coaches were built in two distinct tranches: the early vehicles (1951–60) and the 'Commonwealth' stock (named from the type of bogie used) from 1961 onwards.
They have been painted in a large variety of liveries and very produced in various types: First, Second or Composite, Coach, Brake/Coach, Restaurant, etc.
The Mk 1 coaches have been in operation until 2005.

From Wikipedia
Road Name History:
The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company that linked London with the south-west and west of England, the Midlands, and most of Wales. It was founded in 1833, received its enabling Act of Parliament on 31 August 1835 and ran its first trains in 1838. It was engineered by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, who chose a broad gauge of 7 ft (2,134 mm)—later slightly widened to 7 ft 1⁄4 in (2,140 mm)—but, from 1854, a series of amalgamations saw it also operate 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard-gauge trains; the last broad-gauge services were operated in 1892. The GWR was the only company to keep its identity through the Railways Act 1921, which amalgamated it with the remaining independent railways within its territory, and it was finally merged at the end of 1947 when it was nationalised and became the Western Region of British Railways.

The GWR was called by some "God's Wonderful Railway" and by others the "Great Way Round" but it was famed as the "Holiday Line", taking many people to English and Bristol Channel resorts in the West Country as well as the far south-west of England such as Torquay in Devon, Minehead in Somerset, and Newquay and St Ives in Cornwall. The company's locomotives, many of which were built in the company's workshops at Swindon, were painted a Brunswick green colour while, for most of its existence, it used a two-tone "chocolate and cream" livery for its passenger coaches. Goods wagons were painted red but this was later changed to mid-grey.

Great Western trains included long-distance express services such as the Flying Dutchman, the Cornish Riviera Express and the Cheltenham Spa Express. It also operated many suburban and rural services, some operated by steam railmotors or autotrains. The company pioneered the use of larger, more economic goods wagons than were usual in Britain. It operated a network of road motor (bus) routes, was a part of the Railway Air Services, and owned ships, docks and hotels.

From Wikipedia
Brand/Importer Information: Lima N scale European models were numbered with 3 digits until 1978. They were renumbered after 1978 by adding "320" before the previous number. e.g. "306" became "320306".
Manufacturer Information:
Lima S.p.A (Lima Models) was a brand of railway models made in Vicenza, Italy, for almost 50 years, from the early 1950s until the company ceased trading in 2004. Lima was a popular, affordable brand of 00 gauge and N gauge model railway material in the UK, more detailed H0 and N gauge models in France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, and the United States as well as South Africa, Scandinavia and Australia. Lima also produced a small range of 0 gauge models. Lima partnered with various distributors and manufacturers, selling under brands such as A.H.M., Model Power, Minitrain and PMI (Precision Models of Italy). Market pressures from superior Far Eastern produce in the mid-1990s led to Lima merging with Rivarossi, Arnold, and Jouef. Ultimately, these consolidations failed and operations ceased in 2004.

Hornby Railways offered €8 million to acquire Lima's assets (including tooling, inventory, and the various brand names) in March of the same year, the Italian bankruptcy court of Brescia (town near Milan, last headquarters of Lima) approving the offer later that year. In December 2004, Hornby Railways formally announced the acquisition along with the Rivarossi (H0 North American and Italian prototypes), Arnold (N scale European prototypes), Jouef (H0 scale French prototypes), and Pocher (die-cast metal automobile kits) ranges. As of mid-2006, a range of these products has been made available under the Hornby International brand, refitted with NEM couplings and sprung buffers and sockets for DCC (Digital Command Control) decoders.

From Wikipedia
Item created by: Alain LM on 2018-09-29 12:35:50. Last edited by Alain LM on 2020-11-01 09:56:25

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