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N Scale - Squeak N Products - 0031 - Caboose, Cupola, Steel, NE - Susquehanna - 0118

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N Scale - Squeak N Products - 0031 - Caboose, Cupola, Steel, NE - Susquehanna - 0118


Brand Squeak N Products
Stock Number 0031
Secondary Stock Number SQ-0031
Manufacturer Life-Like
Production Type Regular Production
Body Style Life-Like Caboose Cupola NE
Prototype Caboose, Cupola, Steel, NE (Details)
Road or Company Name Susquehanna (Details)
Reporting Marks NYSW
Road or Reporting Number 0118
Paint Color(s) Red w. Black roof
Print Color(s) White
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Body-Mount
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Caboose
Model Subtype Cupola
Model Variety NE
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era II: Late Steam (1901 - 1938)
Years Produced 1924-1948
Scale 1/160



Model Information: Life-Like first introduced this body style in the 90's. They have metal wheels and truck-mounted Rapido couplers. The caboose design is based on a common prototype used by many Northeastern roads.

Prototype History:
The Northeast or NE style caboose was introduced by the Reading Railroad in 1924. The design was an all-steel version of a USRA design. The acquisition of these new cabooses was prompted by proposed Pennsylvania legislation requiring larger, more structurally sound caboose for use in through freight consists. The original set of cabooses was ordered from AC&F, but other manufacturers also adopted similar designs.

The Reading selection was made after the consideration of several designs. The original purchase was for 10 cars in 1924, but the design was so effective that it became the de-facto Reading standard and they continued purchasing new cabooses of this type through 1948. The design soon became popular with other Northeastern railroads such as the WM, L&NE, LV, CNJ and others.

Road Name History:
The New York, Susquehanna & Western Railway (reporting mark NYSW) (a.k.a. the Susie-Q or the Susquehanna) is a Class II American freight railway operating over 500 miles (800 km) of track in the northeastern states of New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. It was formed in 1881 from the merger of several smaller railroads. Passenger service in Northern New Jersey was offered until 1966. The railroad was purchased by the Delaware Otsego Corporation in 1980, and became a regional player during the 1980s in the intermodal freight transport business.

The New York, Susquehanna & Western can trace its roots back to the Hoboken, Ridgefield & Paterson Railroad, chartered in 1866 to connect industrial Paterson, New Jersey, with the ports along the Hudson Waterfront opposite New York City at Hoboken. That same year, the New York and Oswego Midland Railroad was chartered to connect the Great Lakes port at Oswego, New York, with New York City. Several competing companies sprang up in 1867, but the New Jersey Western was the most successful, constructing westward from Paterson and Hawthorne. Cornelious Wortendyke, president of the New Jersey Western Railroad (NJW), signed a lease agreement with DeWitt Clinton Littlejohn of the New York, Ontario and Western Railway (NYO&W) giving his road a through route into New Jersey. Construction on the NY&OM started in 1868 and progressed rapidly. The NJW changed its name to the New Jersey Midland Railway in 1870, and construction had stretched from Hackensack, New Jersey, all the way through to Hanford.

Currently, the NYS&W operates over 500 miles of track in three states. The network consists of three main routes, one running from Northern New Jersey to Binghamton and the other two branching north from Binghamton to serve Utica and Syracuse.

From Wikipedia

Item created by: Alain LM on 2019-06-30 03:09:09. Last edited by scottakoltz on 2020-05-19 13:59:22

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