Search:
Type the text to search here and press Enter.
Separate search terms by a space; they will all be searched individually in all fields of the database.

Click on Search: to go to the advanced search page.

N Scale - PMI - 7071 - Stock Car, 40 Foot, Steel - Armour and Company - 216

Please help support TroveStar. Why?

N Scale - PMI - 7071 - Stock Car, 40 Foot, Steel - Armour and Company - 216


Brand PMI
Stock Number 7071
Manufacturer Lima
Production Type Regular Production
Body Style Lima Stock Car 45 Foot Steel
Prototype Stock Car, 40 Foot, Steel (Details)
Road or Company Name Armour and Company (Details)
Reporting Marks ASX
Road or Reporting Number 216
Additional Markings/Slogan Armour Stock Express
Paint Color(s) Red
Print Color(s) Yellow
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Deep Flange
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Stock Car
Model Subtype 45 Foot
Model Variety Steel
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: This body style was first produced by Lima for AHM in the 1960s. It was later imported using Lima's own branding. It has also been imported by PMI. It shares a common underframe with several other Lima toolings including a gondola and reefer. It has annoying clip-attached trucks that make them hard to upgrade to MTL couplers.

Prototype History:
Alonzo Mather, a Chicago clothing merchant who founded the Mather Stock Car Company, designed a new stock car in 1880 that was among the first to include amenities for feeding and watering the animals while en route. Mather was awarded a gold medal in 1883 by the American Humane Association for the humane treatment afforded to animals in his stock cars. Minneapolis' Henry C. Hicks patented a convertible boxcar/stock car in 1881, which was improved in 1890 with features that included a removable double deck. George D. Burton of Boston introduced his version of the humane stock car in 1882, which was placed into service the following year. The Burton Stock Car Company's design provided sufficient space so as to allow the animals to lie down in transit on a bed of straw.

Steel stock cars were in general use after the Second World War when steel became readily available.

From Wikipedia

Road Name History:
Armour & Company was an American company that was one of the five leading firms in the meat packing industry. It was founded in Chicago, in 1867, by the Armour brothers, led by Philip Danforth Armour. By 1880, the company had become Chicago's most important business and had helped make Chicago and its Union Stock Yards the center of America's meatpacking industry. During the same period, its facility in Omaha, Nebraska, boomed, as well, making the city's meatpacking industry the largest in the nation by 1959. In the 1980s, the Armour brand was split between shelf-stable meat products and refrigerated meat products. Today, each is owned by different entities.

The Armour Star (shelf-stable) brand includes meat-based lard and canned entrees, including hash, chili, stews, and potted meats. The rights to the Armour Star food brand are owned by Pinnacle Foods. The Armour brand for refrigerated meats is now owned by Smithfield Foods of Smithfield, Virginia, through their affiliate, Armour Eckrich LLC. The Armour brand for use in the pharmaceutical industry is owned by Forest Laboratories.

From Wikipedia

Manufacturer Information:
Lima S.p.A (Lima Models) was a brand of railway models made in Vicenza, Italy, for almost 50 years, from the early 1950s until the company ceased trading in 2004. Lima was a popular, affordable brand of 00 gauge and N gauge model railway material in the UK, more detailed H0 and N gauge models in France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, and the United States as well as South Africa, Scandinavia and Australia. Lima also produced a small range of 0 gauge models. Lima partnered with various distributors and manufacturers, selling under brands such as A.H.M., Model Power, Minitrain and PMI (Precision Models of Italy). Market pressures from superior Far Eastern produce in the mid-1990s led to Lima merging with Rivarossi, Arnold, and Jouef. Ultimately, these consolidations failed and operations ceased in 2004.

Hornby Railways offered €8 million to acquire Lima's assets (including tooling, inventory, and the various brand names) in March of the same year, the Italian bankruptcy court of Brescia (town near Milan, last headquarters of Lima) approving the offer later that year. In December 2004, Hornby Railways formally announced the acquisition along with the Rivarossi (H0 North American and Italian prototypes), Arnold (N scale European prototypes), Jouef (H0 scale French prototypes), and Pocher (die-cast metal automobile kits) ranges. As of mid-2006, a range of these products has been made available under the Hornby International brand, refitted with NEM couplings and sprung buffers and sockets for DCC (Digital Command Control) decoders.

From Wikipedia

Item created by: gdm on 2019-07-10 16:28:00. Last edited by gdm on 2019-07-10 16:28:16

If you see errors or missing data in this entry, please feel free to log in and edit it. Anyone with a Gmail account can log in instantly.