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N Scale - Aurora Rail Masters - 5441 - Locomotive, Diesel, Plymouth WDT - Santa Fe - Red Ball Express

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N Scale - Aurora Rail Masters - 5441 - Locomotive, Diesel, Plymouth WDT - Santa Fe - Red Ball Express


N Scale - Aurora Rail Masters - 5441 - Locomotive, Diesel, Plymouth WDT - Santa Fe - Red Ball Express


Brand Aurora Rail Masters
Stock Number 5441
Manufacturer Aurora Mexico
Production Type Regular Production
Body Style Aurora Train Set Rail Masters
Prototype Locomotive, Diesel, Plymouth WDT (Details)
Road or Company Name Santa Fe (Details)
Road or Reporting Number Red Ball Express
Paint Color(s) Various
Print Color(s) Various
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Deep Flange
Announcement Date 1975-01-01
Release Date 1977-01-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype Freight
Model Variety Plymouth MDT Switcher
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160



Prototype History:
The Plymouth Locomotive Works was founded in 1910. They specialized in small switcher locomotives for industrial use. The WDT was the 6-wheel model of their diesel switcher.

With 6-wheels, the WDT could handle a fairly heavy powerplant capable of moving small numbers of very heavy freight cars. When a railroad moves a freight car, the owner of the freight car is charged every time the car is moved. The typical floor price for such a move is $200. For an industrial complex that has to shunt 100's of cars daily, it quickly becomes economical to own your own switchers rather than contract with a railroad. Plymouth locomotive works specialized in providing purpose built engines for exactly this purpose: providing a low-cost alternative to using a railroad to move cars around your yard. Own your own low-maintenance, high-power industrial yard switcher.

Road Name History:
The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (reporting mark ATSF), often abbreviated as Santa Fe or AT&SF, was one of the larger railroads in the United States. Chartered in February 1859, the railroad reached the Kansas-Colorado border in 1873 and Pueblo, Colorado, in 1876. To create a demand for its services, the railroad set up real estate offices and sold farm land from the land grants that it was awarded by Congress. Despite the name, its main line never served Santa Fe, New Mexico, as the terrain was too difficult; the town ultimately was reached by a branch line from Lamy.

The Santa Fe was a pioneer in intermodal freight transport, an enterprise that (at one time or another) included a tugboat fleet and an airline (the short-lived Santa Fe Skyway). Its bus line extended passenger transportation to areas not accessible by rail, and ferryboats on the San Francisco Bay allowed travelers to complete their westward journeys to the Pacific Ocean. The ATSF was the subject of a popular song, Harry Warren & Johnny Mercer's "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe", written for the film, The Harvey Girls (1946).

The railroad officially ceased operations on December 31, 1996, when it merged with the Burlington Northern Railroad to form the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Railway.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
In 1975 Aurora was on its third owner and about to give up the ghost. They had terminated the Postage Stamp Trains line five years earlier, but the owners evidently made a last-ditch attempt to re-enter the N Scale model railroading market with Rail Masters. This was a very small, oddball product line consisting of battery-operated locomotives and Mexican-made rolling stock using a new coupler type that was completely incompatible with every other coupler on the market.

Item created by: scottakoltz on 2019-03-01 08:54:44. Last edited by scottakoltz on 2019-03-01 12:22:01

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